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Active Anemone
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I am just being a worried parent but what are these and are they a threat to the tank?

Below the bubble coral



I removed this next one from my tank. Looks like a centipede in the water.



I have heard of bristle worms and stuff but i have never seen them. Can you guys tell me if this is stuff i need to remove from tank or let it go. I removed the worm looking guy but the coral/anemone looking thing i left.
 

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Bristle worms are terribly bad. They are kind of interesting to look at, and if they don't bother anything why take them out?
 

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Veteran Newbie
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I'm assuming you meant aren't terribly bad Zark? They themselves are not a problem, and are actually quite nice detritivores. However, they can be an indication of a nutrient problem if you start seeing them en masse.
 

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I don't mind the worms. I usually pull them out if I can catch and put them in my overflow. They seem to eat all the detritus at the bottom and stay happy and fat. When they run out of food the heard thins when then travel to the filter socks.
 

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Underwater Demolitions
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Zombie bristle worm

<img src="http://www.thereeftank.com/gallery/files/3/5/0/0/1/image_613573.jpg" alt="Bristle Worm" />
 

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Yeah i meant are not my bad. Cleaning the tank out well will reduce the number naturally. I don't think there is any reason to commit bistlewormicide.
 

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I KNEW there was a zombie in there!
Good to know they come apart in a pump, cause it's really hard to stab the head just right like on walking dead :)
JK I prolly killed it with cement and it busted up later

So yeah blaze, wear gloves for a while if you rearrange your rocks. I never saw #2.
 

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Underwater Demolitions
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It is possible to have too many worms. Generally, this is a sign of too much feeding. If you want to remove one or two here's the deal. Don't bother with traps. Now I know you dont want to hear this, but manual removal is the only way to go. Go to the sporting goods store and buy a hemostat. You will find them in the fly-fishing section; they are used to remove hooks. The advantage to a hemostat over tweezers is that they don't open back up as you grab the worm while screaming loudly (the screaming part is not optional). Bait them with an algea wafer on the sand bed whilst you lie in wait with the hemostat. Once it comes out grab him! Scream! Scream! Be quick! Remove him to the trash. I myself would not flush it in case it crawled back up. Kidding! (Maybe)
 
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