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NewfieReefer
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285 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So is it a safe method of rasiing the PH in a reef tank?? I heard of people doing it but never done it myself. If it is safe can someone give the formula to rasie my PH. It seems like it stuck at about 8.0 and I would like to raise it one notch.

DERM
:beer:
CHEERS
 

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Banggai Mommy
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2,395 Posts
Baking soda is a poor choice, and a quick fix at best. 8.0 isn't that bad, although B-Ionic is one of the better choices out there.

Kalkwasser is another option, but it's trickier than just dosing B-Ionic. (As in, it's hard to mess it up, and the B-Ionic will help buffer the water in addition to adding calcium.)

Danielle
 

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NewfieReefer
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285 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
So is 8.0 good and safe to keep it at? I thought for a reef tank you needed about 8.2?

DERM
 

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double cappuccino
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8.1 - 8.3 is best

Sodium bicarbonate generally will not raise your Ph over 8.0 (if it even gets that high).

Ph/Alk and their mixed up crazy relationship is something you should brush up on though, quite informative.

here is a link to get started :)
 

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From what I know baking soda works well in fresh water tanks only. It takes the ph up to around 7.2 to 7.4. I use it in my fw tank but use sea buffer to boost my ph up over 8 in my sw tank.
 

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double cappuccino
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Bob Fenner does give some kudos to it's use in The Conscientious Marine Aquarist so there is some merit to it. Worth a brush up if you have the book.
 

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Derm,

I would do more water changes and dose kalkwasser to get my pH and alk up and forget about baking soda. This is the best article I've found that describes the relationship between CA, Alk and pH and how to go about fixing problems:

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/nov2002/chem.htm

Often pH is low if your skimmer is weak or your salinity is low. Most salinity floats sold to the aquarium industry are total garbage and are calibrated for about 75 degf. The good lab grade certified ones from VWR etc, are about $30 and are calibrated for 59 or 60 degF. Either way you need to use a table to relate calibration temp to salinity:

Here is a link to a lab grade certified hydrometer:

http://www.vwrsp.com/catalog/produc...ject_id=0009308

Part# 34627-231 Certified 1.000 to 1.070 hydrometer

w/Shipping $31.52

Here is the table:

PPT
xx 59.00F 60.00F 68.00F 69.80F 71.60F 73.40F 75.20F 77.00F 78.80F 80.60F 82.00F 84.20F 86.00F

20 1.0145 1.0144 1.0134 1.0132 1.0130 1.0127 1.0124 1.0121 1.0118 1.0115 1.0112 1.0109 1.0106
21 1.0153 1.0152 1.0142 1.0140 1.0137 1.0135 1.0132 1.0129 1.0126 1.0123 1.0120 1.0116 1.0113
22 1.0160 1.0159 1.0150 1.0147 1.0144 1.0142 1.0139 1.0137 1.0134 1.0130 1.0127 1.0124 1.0120
23 1.0168 1.0167 1.0157 1.0155 1.0152 1.0150 1.0147 1.0144 1.0141 1.0138 1.0135 1.0132 1.0128
24 1.0175 1.0174 1.0164 1.0162 1.0160 1.0156 1.0154 1.0151 1.0148 1.0145 1.0142 1.0139 1.0135
25 1.0183 1.0182 1.0172 1.0170 1.0167 1.0165 1.0162 1.0159 1.0156 1.0153 1.0150 1.0146 1.0143
26 1.0191 1.0189 1.0180 1.0176 1.0174 1.0172 1.0169 1.0166 1.0163 1.0160 1.0157 1.0154 1.0150
27 1.0198 1.0197 1.0187 1.0185 1.0182 1.0180 1.0176 1.0174 1.0171 1.0168 1.0165 1.0162 1.0158
28 1.0206 1.0204 1.0195 1.0192 1.0189 1.0186 1.0184 1.0182 1.0179 1.0175 1.0172 1.0168 1.0165
29 1.0214 1.0212 1.0202 1.0200 1.0197 1.0195 1.0192 1.0189 1.0186 1.0183 1.0180 1.0175 1.0172
30 1.0222 1.0220 1.0210 1.0208 1.0205 1.0202 1.0199 1.0196 1.0193 1.0190 1.0187 1.0184 1.0180
31 1.0229 1.0227 1.0217 1.0215 1.0212 1.0209 1.0207 1.0204 1.0201 1.0198 1.0195 1.0192 1.0188
32 1.0237 1.0235 1.0225 1.0222 1.0219 1.0217 1.0214 1.0211 1.0208 1.0205 1.0202 1.0198 1.0195
33 1.0245 1.0243 1.0232 1.0230 1.0227 1.0225 1.0221 1.0218 1.0215 1.0212 1.0209 1.0205 1.0202
34 1.0252 1.0251 1.0240 1.0238 1.0235 1.0232 1.0229 1.0226 1.0223 1.0220 1.0217 1.0214 1.0210
35 1.0260 1.0258 1.0248 1.0245 1.0242 1.0240 1.0237 1.0234 1.0231 1.0228 1.0225 1.0221 1.0218
36 1.0268 1.0266 1.0255 1.0253 1.0250 1.0247 1.0245 1.0242 1.0238 1.0235 1.0232 1.0228 1.0225
37 1.0275 1.0273 1.0263 1.0260 1.0258 1.0255 1.0252 1.0249 1.0245 1.0242 1.0239 1.0236 1.0232
38 1.0283 1.0281 1.0271 1.0268 1.0265 1.0262 1.0259 1.0256 1.0253 1.0250 1.0247 1.0244 1.0240
39 1.0291 1.0289 1.0278 1.0275 1.0273 1.0270 1.0267 1.0264 1.0261 1.0258 1.0255 1.0251 1.0248
40 1.0299 1.0297 1.0286 1.0284 1.0281 1.0278 1.0274 1.0271 1.0268 1.0265 1.0262 1.0258 1.0255

First, this is how it works. You can use a 60 F (59F) table if it is set up like this one.
1. Using the temperature of your tank, go to the column that has approximately that temperature.
2. Scroll down until you see the SG you have on your hydrometer.
3. Now move straight across to the left, until you are in the column that has your hydrometer calibration
temperature (probably 77F for fish store and 59F or 60F for lab grade).
4. Read the SG at the calibration temperature in that column.
5. Now take that reading and go over to the second column and look for that SG reading and note its Salinity. That is the
salinity of your tank.

Example:

Tank @ 81 F (or 80.6 F)_and meter reads 1.022. The 77 F column shows 1.0226 ( rounded off is 1.023). Now look at column 2 for 1.023 (1.0229)_and the Salinity will equal 31ppt.....to low. If you are looking for normal Salinity of 35 ppt, your meter at 81 F would read about 1.025. Normal salinity is 35 ppt @ 1.026 in 77 F water with the meter calibrated to 77 F, so 1.026 -.001= 1.025 for 35 [email protected] 81 F tank temp using a 77 F meter calibration _

conversion program:

http://www.phys.ocean.dal.ca/~kelle...er/density.html

Good Luck!

:dance:

Bill
 

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or you can buy an atc refractometer, and save all the paper it would take to print out that chart.
 
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