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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a small amount of phosphates in my reef tank, and I cant figure out where they are coming from. I think I am getting them from something I am putting in but I use quality stuff so I thought I would post and ask if anyone knows anything about these products having phosphates in them. I have a reactor but I need to change the media, which I will be doing soon but, I still would like to get to the root of the problem. Here we go, I use Red Sea Salt, Hikari frozen brine and mysis, Kent Chromamax, Kent Lugols, TLF C- balance, TLF Marine Snow, TLF Kalkwasser, Seachem Prime, Aquavitro Fuel, Aquavitro Ions, Aquavitro 8.4, and TLF Phosban. I think thats everything. Im also using a BRS 5 Stage RO/DI unit but dont have any phosphates in my tap water to start with. I wonder if the Phosban in the reactor could be releasing phosphates back into the system? This is a 100 gal tank with 150lbs of live rock. I have a wet/dry on it put no bio balls, the water just circulates through the empty wet/dry. I dont have any algae in the tank and the corals look pretty good. How do you use this chaeto stuff? Does it need a light to survive and could I use that in the wet/dry? Anyone have any ideas?
 

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Phosban is marketed saying it does not release the phosphates back into the system, it will just become uneffective. If my media were old I would change it immediately just in case that marketing stragegy is not truthful.

My bet is on your sand and rocks releasing it, which brings up questions. How old is your sandbed? Do you siphon your sand with each water change? Speaking of which, what is your water change schedule?

Chaeto does require a light. I have read that it will not do well in a very low nutrient system. If you have NO algae in your tank, you may not have enough nutrients to keep chaeto alive, or so I have read.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I dont rinse the food, I put it in a net and let it melt before releasing it into the tank. The sand bed is around 4 years old and since there is alot of rock there are areas I cant get to while siphoning. I probably could be more dilligent on siphoning and water changes. I think I have enough nutrients for the chaeto. I forgot to say I dont have a skimmer hooked up either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In reply to the questions, I stated in an above thread, the sand has been in there about four years and it about an inch and a half deep. The fish are as follows: a maroon clown, sixline wrasse, a blackwidow blennie, and a green chromis, all in a 100 gal. I also have a reef lobster, various snails, hermit crabs, and a couple starfish. Maybe its just a normal occurrence as crazy_about_salt said. It does build up in time but not quickly.
 

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any food you feed to the tank contains phosphates. marine snow is nothing but detritus, so there is a big source of phosphates right there. phosphates sponges only work for a limited time before needing replacement. they may not leech phosphates back into the system, but they will not absorb any more either. so if the media is used up then any phosphates going through the reactor will also flow right back out again.

have you read through this thread yet? it will help explain a lot about how phosphates behave in our systems.

G~
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I siphon the detritus out regularly and I dont have a problem with it, cleanup crew helps also. What should I feed instead of marine snow? I always thought TLf was good stuff.
 

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I siphon the detritus out regularly and I dont have a problem with it, cleanup crew helps also. What should I feed instead of marine snow? I always thought TLf was good stuff.
nobody is saying it is not good stuff. when did good stuff mean no phosphates? by definition marine snow and phytoplankton are phosphates. that is what they are. look them up on wikipedia, or where ever. phytoplankton is just tiny algae, and as we know algae contain phosphates, so when adding phytoplankton you are adding phosphates. the same goes for marine snow. marine snow is just the detritus that falls to the bottom of the ocean. it is the stuff nothing wanted to eat from the oceans surface. there is a reason why all of the phosphate mining in the world is done on exposed ancient ocean beds. ;)

blender mush is the best food to feed a mixed tank. you can either make your own or buy the frozen cubes. these mixes contain all kinds of different sized food bits from the blending part. the bigger chunks feed the fish the micro bits feed the corals. ALL FOOD CONTAINS PHOSPHATES. that is how living organisms create energy. the object is to get organically bound phosphates, so that the critters eating it will use it instead of the algae taking it immediately. as with any food. if left to rot the bacteria will quickly release the phosphates and make it available for algae and cyano, so being able to remove detritus is important regardless of what is being fed.

G~
 
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