The Reef Tank banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2 month old tank is getting diatom blooms from time to time as I do the water changes. I used to blast the diatoms on the LS with my turkey baster, but i read on the forum recently it's not good to disturb the sandbed...

Is this also true for new tanks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hmm... I thought so, good thing I stopped doing that couple weeks ago.

I have a 10 gallon nano, it's doing good so far. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
http://www.thereeftank.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=23992

Here's the thread grabbed from the nano section... this is what my tank looked like a week ago, I have since then took out one of the dead corals.

I think I need to get more LR though, it's still looking kind of bare.

When I start to take more pics, I'll probably set it up in my member section to track the overall changes of my tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,816 Posts
Nice looking little nano tank. About 10-15lbs of LR should do fine and I would take out the fake corals for the more natural look!:)
 

·
BRW member
Joined
·
2,610 Posts
i have heard that you are supposed to blast detritus off your rock, is that true? or is it best not to? also, in my FOWLR, I vacuum my 1 inch of cc to get some detritus out once a month or so, is this recommended as well? i have a few hermits and snails in there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,816 Posts
I blast my LR about twice a month and makes quite a sand storm in my reef but the tube snails love it as they send out muscus strands to catch the particles in the water!:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,355 Posts
Cleaning (and blasting) the rock is different from cleaning the sand. You need to remove the detritus that accumulates on the rock either by siphoning or by using a powerhead or turkey baster to "hydroblast" the rock to suspend the detritus, then running the skimmer wide open with a wet skimmate (hopefully into an oversized collection bucket) to remove the suspended materials from the water column. I refer the blasting/skimming methodology, as you don't end up removing critters like the little mini-brittle stars, etc. accidentally with a siphon. Don't forget to turn off any auto top-off devices while doing this to prevent salinity drops, and make sure to replace whatever skimmate you remove from the system with fresh SW.

If you have algal mats or heavy dustings of diatoms, it would be good to remove them from the surface of the sandbed with judicious careful siphoning of the detritus off the very surface of the sand (not the sand itself). This not only removes the unsightly materials, but by removing the biomass of these blooming organisms, the substances that drive such blooms are removed as well (as they are locked up in the very biomass you desire to remove). If you have crushed coral, prolly best to clean the gravel, even if it is a deep gravel sand bed, in order to remove the trapped detritus from the interstitial spaces. Sugar-sized aragonite should not be stirred or disturbed once the O2 gradient establishes itself, as not only will this disturb the balance of algal organism vs. hetertrophic consumption, but it will also disturb the O2 gradient as well, affecting the functionality of the sandbed both as a carbon cycling mechanism and the sand bed's nitrogen removal processes. If you desire to keep a DSB, maintenance is very important to extend its long-term functionability.

HTH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have taken out most of the dead corals in my tank, since it does disrupt the natural look of the tank. However, I have left one dead coral in there because it's starting to show some algae growth and three feather dusters have crept out of it. Not to mention some foraminiferans as well.

I'm a little reluctant to take it out because it's starting to show life, and honestly, I like it. :D But yes, it doesn't look very good among the LR. My LFS owner did tell me this though, if I leave it in the tank long enough, under the right circumstances, the dead coral would be covered with enough bio growth that it would in turn become "live" again... is this true? Would you take it out if you were me? :confused:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,355 Posts
~Rookie Wookie~ said:
I'm a little reluctant to take it out because it's starting to show life, and honestly, I like it...
Depending on the specie and your water quality, some corals will recover, even though there is apparently no tissue left on the skeleton. This is especially true of some of the large polyped corals like Euphyliids and some of the Fungiids. Place the skeleton where there isn't much light (to prevent algal growth) and check it every few weeks, you may be surprised. What specimens died?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Actually I don't have a clue, I was at my LFS a month and a half ago buying LR, and the owner said if I wanted it because a customer had killed it. So I took it for free without even asking what specie it was, a true rookie I am... :funny:

But here's a pic if it helps.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,355 Posts
~Rookie Wookie~ said:
...I was at my LFS a month and a half ago buying LR, and the owner said if I wanted it because a customer had killed it...
yeah, that one is not one that will come back. Prolly some specie of Acropora, might be a Hydnopora spp. but the skeleton doesn't look like it has enough ridging laterally.

Many of the branching Euphyllia spp. of corals will regenerate some polyp development from small tissue tags on the skeleton. I have a 6 year old specimen of E. anchora that has been fragged 8 or 9 times that started from such a "dead" skeleton, there are pix somewhere in the archives of the particular specimen (btw, this is a perfect example of why you want to farm out at least a few frags of those fraggable specimens to your friends, as without such a reservoir, I would not now have a specimen of this coral after last year's extended power outtage during the ice storm). I believe Cath may have a frag of the 4th or 5th fragging.

The skeleton of the specimen you have is now part of the LR rubble at this point. Personally anything that is dead skeleton of this group of corals I remove from the tank, as there is always the potential that the skeleton may be a harbor for potential coral pathogens, but that is JM2CW... ...I guess you could soak it in chlorine bleach to kill any potential pathogens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
:( I was hoping it would have a chance of making a come back, but I guess it's good to yank it out anyway since it disrupts the look of the tank.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top