The Reef Tank banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few newbie questions...

1. I guess I understand this but want to make sure and know how it works. So you buy a frag of the coral you want, these seem to be usually smaller pieces of coral attached to some rock, find a place that you think is suitable and place it there making sure it is secured. If it likes the arrangement; lighting, water flow, and water quality, it will begin to grow and expand thus attaching itself to the underlying rock or sand. If this is basically correct, how long before you see growth and expansion? I am thinking like xenias, zoanthus, pachyclavularia, anthelia, favias (this is a stoney coral).

2. What are the best methods of feeding and what best to feed a spectrum of corals?

3. What should I look for to see if there are potential problems, such as inadequate lighting, not enough food, too much or too little water flow, poor water quality, etc?

Thanks for all the help.
 

· 300 Gallon Reef Tank
Joined
·
2,123 Posts
Sounds right to me. As for feeding, you may want to research the coral before purchasing as corals require a wide range of food source. Potential problems really depend on the coral as well but you can expect them to usually take a little time before they fully open up after a move. Problems could be never opening to bleaching or melting away. I'm sure others will offer more info...
 

· The camaro loving reefer
Joined
·
3,941 Posts
go with a few things in mind to. do some reading about corals u like, than go look at them.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
654 Posts
...
3. What should I look for to see if there are potential problems, such as inadequate lighting, not enough food, too much or too little water flow, poor water quality, etc?
Of the list of corals you have in #1, we have xenia, zoanthids and favites (which, iirc, are similar to favias).
Zoas will stretch toward the light if they aren't getting enough. If happy, they usually look almost flat against the rock.
xenia seem happy just about anywhere :) but the stalks and hands get skinny/stringy if they don't have enough light. How much they pulse might also be related to health.
With the favites, we watch their color and its feeding tentacles. Ours brighten up when they get the light they want, and they extend their tentacles regularly. One frag we got didn't, and it began to die. When we changed its position, it promptly started growing & extending tentacles.

hth
 

· Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
well to answer your questions as best as I can( Im no absolute pro, although I'm working on it :eek:)

1. Thats basically how it works, just remember that some corals grow WAAAYYY faster than others, for example, green star polyps grow like wild fire so while it may look nice for a while right in the middle of the rockwork, it'll spread it looks rather strange to have one type of coral dominating a tank, unlesss you like that sort of thing. Xenia is similar in that aspect. Also keep in mind that the more mature and balanced your tank is, the better the growth, and that simply takes time, don't rush it as this is a NATURAL system, the ocean doesnt have the newest trendy "Insta-Reef-Now!!!" products being dumped into it, so neither should the tank. As for corals growing on to the sand, that doesn't happen as far as I know, as they anchor themselves to the rock. they can grow onto rubble thats in the sand though. People like to put "islands" of corals in the sand, like types of coral that would spread too fast or sting others, or simply just look better in the white background of the sand, and what they do is either put the coral on a small rock in such a way that the rock can't be seen and is put in the sand ( like clams, some brains etc.) or put the coral on rocks that can be seen, but with the intention of letting the coral grow more and spread on that rock ( this is like zoas, palys, gsp, sometimes xenia, acans, sometimes even mushrooms) this works best at least for me with rocks roughly the size of like a lemon or a bit smaller; much bigger and it becomes overbearing. The idea of the tanks for most people is aesetics (i know i spelled that wrong, Im kind of tired) , and your the person that is going to be looking at it the most, so make it how YOU like. Also some corals don't really grow ON the rock per say, like spreading, they grow outwards like trees and make interesting contrasts - leathers, many LSP, acros, kenya trees, gorgians, that kind of thing.

2. for feeding corals, some corals don't need to be fed, and or even won't even eat if you try to :D , like xenias or green star polyps, others like more meaty substances, like anemones, candycanes or sun corals. Also there are filter feeders, that really don't need much, correct me if I'm wrong on this forum, but i believe some leathers do, some polyps, and sponges too i believe. For an all around easy way to feed, well if you get all corals that don't really need food as they're photosynthetic ( xenias, yellow polyps, mushrooms, zoas, frogspawn, hammercoral, green star polyps and many many others) then don't stress, and the care of the tank is that much easier. For other corals an easy , although not the most efficient, is to get this type of coral food that is a powder and sprinkle some into the main flow of the tank, like marine snow, cyclopleze, that kind of thing. This wastes quite a bit and dirties the tank so i wouldnt do that more than twice a week. The other option is using the same product with a CLEAN AND UNUSED turkey baster or medicine drop and do what is called spot feeding, which is basically dispersing the food only where needed.

3. Finally, as for spotting problems, the best thing i can say is, observe your tank. Look at it. A lot :D. And then some more. It shouldn't be too hard to do. When you know what everything looks like usually, its not too hard to spot something out of the ordinary, and when you do refer to a knowledgable person or post it here, theres great people here who'll help ya out. Also look at how the corals and fish look like in the store, hopefully they're healthy to begin with, (and if they're not, please don't get em, they're more trouble than they're worth unless you really know what your doing) and then keep that in mind when you look at your tank. Are they normal, or is something amiss? Other than that, the best advice I can give isjust stay on top of your water changes, and you'll be fine, the new water contains much of what folks dose for, so the more frequent (once a week is great) the better. Hopes this help, and good luck!
 

· The camaro loving reefer
Joined
·
3,941 Posts
i hope some one reads all that, dont want to waste it.
i only got half way through 1. before i decided i know all of this.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top