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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quite a few of these species are becoming more frequently available in the hobby now and since I have begun yet another project I thought it far enough along to be of some interest (at least I hope so) to those of us taken with shrimp. I keep quite a number of species as pets now and find that as long as they have a bit of territory to call their own, they get along just fine. Many of them are also commensals with other inverts. You might even have some and not know it...lol

The Caridean Shrimp of the Central Visayan Islands

And while I'm at it, I might as well toss these out there as well.

Articles/Projects that might be of some help?

Chuck
 

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Thank you very much for posting the links. You have a ton of great info out there!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, as you may have noticed, a good many of them have yet to be identified or their identifications are still up in the air as I have to send the specimens to various museums/universities and wait to get word on what they are. Its still a huge learning experience for me and have found Raymond Bauer's book "Remarkable shrimps" to be a great guide, along with some top experts in the field being so gracious as to letting me pick their brains..lol What is really exciting is that a few (3 so far) are most likely new species. With about 2,500 known species thought to be in my area, I have a feeling this is going to be a life long project and will never be completed. I hope to add to it tonight as I am about an hour away from spending the day scuba diving the reefs in search of such critters. I'm going to bring home some live rock as well and see what I can add to my hitch hiker pages also. Thanks again!

Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
wow... thats one weird lookin shrimp! lol
I have to say, I'm quite often surprised at many of these shrimp that appear to the naked eye to be quite plain looking, yet get them under a dissecting microscope and they often have quite elaborate colorations and patterns, which in most cases is not a great help in their identifications as many of the shrimp species can alter their colorations to match their surroundings. It can get quite confusing.

Chuck
 
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