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Premium Member
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At $77K for the 300 mi. version, I haven't given it much thought. ;)

Dick:)
 

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Aquatic Philosopher
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Go and watch the Top Gear review (Season 12). While I do not like their approach to electric cars, the Tesla review was decent.

Personally, I would go strait for the Elise and bypass the batteries. It is just a 77K toy (batteries included) that breaks. Think about the legitimate sports cars you can get for 77K and can use on track-days with non 8 hour fuel pitstops
 

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Lost At Sea
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While I have a heavy interest in EV's, I would not yet invest money into the tech. There is still a long way to go. My father is a Director for R&D with a company that develops nano-lithium batteries. In fact, several years back, my Dad was working with Tesla Motors to develop a battery to use in the Tesla cars(Tesla has since gone with Panasonic and his company did more work with Phoneix motor cars here in the U.S.).

While the new battery pack is impressive, the problem is cost. The battery is essentially why the price of the car is so high. And that is the problem with high capacity batteries right now - too expesnive. Even now my father is working with a number of companies to develop means of mass producing the components to help lower cost. The beauty of this tech tho is the quick charge feature. 45min to charge a battery of this size to about 90~ capacity is pretty cool. However if recall my dad's explanantion correctly, you would need a 100amp circuit with 3 phase 480v output( those special charging stations you see popping up in select locations). The nano-lithium titanate cells my dad's company produces have now reached a quick charge rate of 15 minutes for ~80% capacity.

Once more money is provided for companies to research and develop the tech a little more, then I can see EV's being viable. Right now they are cool to see in demonstrations, but aren't practical and really just toys for the wealthy. One of the reasons why my dad's company has shifted focus away from EVs and into other markets. Until the cost of production comes down, there will not be a huge market for high performance lithium battery packs for things such as EVs. Now mass transit vehicles is another thing and has been growing in popularity.
 

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Aquatic Philosopher
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Interesting... sounds like the info that I have been getting from other sources.

My PhD work has been with automobile dependence and fuel economy. Electric vehicles with battery storage is not very feasible IMO. Maybe for specific trip/environments, but other options are the future. The electric motor, however is here, we just need to get away from using stored energy (batteries) and use more hybrid/power generation. That is basically the idea with hydrogen. In the mean time, we can actually use diesel to charge/power the electric motor and less intensive battery and have pleanty of mobility at a very efficient rate. (Think WW2 submarines, it works, and even the boys at TG did this). heck, we could have nuclear cars with this theory, think about the impact on nascar... oh no, they have the bright green flag out as the result of some fall-out coming from Blinkey-Bob Jr car and a small radition leak in turn four.

Other things holding EV ups is federal regulations involving low-speed electric vehicles... some research would find some work of mine... deep in the murky area of google scholar searches
 

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Lost At Sea
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1,505 Posts
Interesting... sounds like the info that I have been getting from other sources.

My PhD work has been with automobile dependence and fuel economy. Electric vehicles with battery storage is not very feasible IMO. Maybe for specific trip/environments, but other options are the future. The electric motor, however is here, we just need to get away from using stored energy (batteries) and use more hybrid/power generation. That is basically the idea with hydrogen. In the mean time, we can actually use diesel to charge/power the electric motor and less intensive battery and have pleanty of mobility at a very efficient rate. (Think WW2 submarines, it works, and even the boys at TG did this). heck, we could have nuclear cars with this theory, think about the impact on nascar... oh no, they have the bright green flag out as the result of some fall-out coming from Blinkey-Bob Jr car and a small radition leak in turn four.

Other things holding EV ups is federal regulations involving low-speed electric vehicles... some research would find some work of mine... deep in the murky area of google scholar searches

+1 you are exactly right which is why the focus of companies like the one my dad works for has shifted away from EV and into other realms such as Smart grids, Remote UPS applications for the military, healthcare, data centers, etc. and then finally HEV and PHEVs for mass transit and commercial applications.

They do not see much of a future trying to use stored energy to power consumer vehicles when other tech can prove more practical.
 

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Just send me a PM ;)
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I can say one thing... I wouldnt count them out just yet (EV's anyway)... Im a lead Maintenance Tech at a facility where they are manufacturing alot of those EV charging stations. The manufacture 2 basic types there, a standard rate long charge station and a quick charge version. In the next couple of months they are going to have a hard time keeping up with demand for the chargers (which will mostly be an OEM option that is offered with the vehicle purchase), orders are expected to multiply 10 fold in the next 6 months, and they are scrambling to figure out how to fill those orders with the current production run in the building.

EV's have a place in the market. They are perfectly suited to city drivers and route type fleet vehicles that are mostly used in city type environments. I would not recommend one for longer trips or turnaround type trips. You simply cannot count on them delivering. However, HFC technology seems to be the cure for this type of technology....now, if the price would come down a ways then the problem would resolve itself and a new infrastructure could begin to emerge. I dont see anything changing for the most part as to our fuel demands and infrastructure for the next 20 years or better though....

Right now, Im with ya Doc... Diesel and diesel hybrids make the most sense. There is alot of money being spent on changing the way they are viewed by the public, and hopefully it will work :)
 

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I would love to see a homeade biodeisel compatable hybrid Mini Clubman for long commutes like mine, and or a 4x4 pickup like the original toyota xtra cab or early 4runner in a deisel electric. I would love to see the mfgr target my market( working guy, long commute, enjoys getting out and off hiway, not mud bogging or rock climbing per se) and a vehicle that will get me from A to B and C even in an Oregon winter. Where I live you can go from the beach, over the Cascades to the High Desert in under 3 hrs. And yah a Sub will work most of the time but there are a few side trips that would challenge it ;)
 

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Aquatic Philosopher
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An EV is perfect for my current commute (Georgetown area of DC to Union Station area of DC)... but I would have to have public charging station because being an interior apartment makes it a long extension cord out to street parking (yikes). But, I take the bus so...
 
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