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r e e f e r 4 l i f e
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wow, so first of all my 10 gallon nano will be turning 9 months old in two weeks! It's been a great tank so far. This morning however I was watching the tank as I usually do in the morning and observing everything and I noticed 3 or 4 small isopods darting around the tank! I've never seen ANY isopods in this tank before. I've pulled some out of my tank at work but I've never seen any in this one. Where the heck did they come from? I was able to catch 3 of them by sucking them up with a turkey baster and quickly removing them from the tank. There's still another one about 1/4 inch in size in the tank that I could see though I don't know where it is now. I thuroughly scan this tank every day and have never seen these in here before. I guess it's possible I may have overlooked them but, WOW. So here's the crazy thing, I haven't added anything to my tank in the last 6 months! Can these guys hide dormant for that long? I realize there are alot of harmless scavenger isopods but I decided I'd rather remove them than take my chances. My fish are both fine. I have two that I've had for 7 months and they are both healthy and happy so at least they aren't affecting my fish. Sooooo weird.
 

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Isopods are pretty shy. I think it is hard to say for sure any tank is isopod free. I might put a bit of meat in at lights out and spring out ninja style with a red light an hour later... but I entertain myself in strange ways :funny:
 

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r e e f e r 4 l i f e
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nah, that actually does sound entertaining.
 

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...and they tend to be photophobic, so not only to they hide from the light during the day, but tend to me most active in the dark when it is most difficult for potential predators to see them. They usually come in on live rock and/or macroalgae. They are a normal bloom of organisms as the tank's food cycles mature and diversify.

Remember, first the grass, then the broomstraw, then briars, then berrys and seeds, then the mice, then foxes, then fox hunters... the terrestrial equavalent of marine algal and benthos succesion.
 

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r e e f e r 4 l i f e
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
...and they tend to be photophobic, so not only to they hide from the light during the day, but tend to me most active in the dark when it is most difficult for potential predators to see them. They usually come in on live rock and/or macroalgae. They are a normal bloom of organisms as the tank's food cycles mature and diversify.

Remember, first the grass, then the broomstraw, then briars, then berrys and seeds, then the mice, then foxes, then fox hunters... the terrestrial equavalent of marine algal and benthos succesion.
Yeah! That's the other really strange part I thought. These ones today were scurrying around in broad daylight. The one's in my reef at the office I've only seen at night (must be evolving, LOL). Good analogy as well, thanks!
 

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Did you ever find out what those critters were? I have the same thing. I think they are algae eaters as they are turning the color of the rock and algae they are one?
Also how do you get your corals to stick to the new live rock?

I saw your 20L post and you have a great tank!
 
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