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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am aquascaping or about to and I was wondering what the best way to secure the rockwork is, I am going to be building upward and do not want any rouge pieces shifting and slamming into my glass. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I had heard about that, I was just wondering if there was any other ways that may be easier and not involve breaking out the concrete bit on the drill press. However I think that may be the best way to do it and allows some really nice designs.
 

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You can use epoxy putty to help secure joints. You can get the Harvey's 2 part expoxy putty at Menard's or HD for cheaper and is the same thing not to mention readily available. You can go through quite a bit of putty and can be time consuming. Also, the epoxy putty does make your skimmer go nuts so leave it off for 24-48 hours.

Also, doing the stacking method usually requires for $$ in rock.

On a typical 125g or less tank, once you get the swing of it, the drilling method only takes a couple of hours. As long as you use a concrete bit and not just a masonry one, it's actually easy and goes quick. You don't need a drill press, I recommend just the cheapy $10 drill in case it gets ruined.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am thinking of doing a combination of stacking on one side with arch going across to the other side I will have to post some pics when I am finnished, dave thanks for the epoxy idea should save some $$ and time, is the epoxy going to be toxic to my fish??? This may be a dumb question but would it help to heat the fiberglass rod and mold it to the arch i want or does fiberglass not work this way?
 

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The epoxy putty is fine. No harm to fish or corals ( unless maybe some actually fell on a coral while curing or something ). Only side effect is the skimmer going crazy and possibly overflowing if you don't turn it down or completely off.

Acrlic rod is exactly 3/8" so with a 3/8" bit and the grit in the hole from drilling makes it's hard sometimes to slide the rock onto it. Plus when the arcylic rod is longer for bigger structures it can make the structure sway more because not as rigid. I much prefer the fiberglass rod more readly available and is slightly smaller than 3/8" so slides in/out much easier. Only downside is the color so you have to put the putty on any exposed to hide it.

I would stick with using straight rod. For arches, usually I just drill the rock at an angle to slide the rod into. Makes good slopes and two slopes leaning inwards with a rock sandwiched on top makes a good arch.
 
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