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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
about a month or two ago, i picked up a burgundy sea star,
http://www.liveaquaria.com/product/prod_Display.cfm?pCatId=566

about 2 weeks ago, i noticed one of its legs were missing, the leg was attached to a piece of rock, still clinging for all its worth. i didnt think much of it, ive read about situations like this before. but this morning, it lost another leg, it was attached to the glass, and about 4" away was its missing leg, its first missing leg seems to be comming back already, but im wondering if this is common with this species, or maybe something else is wrong, i also have a blue linkia that is doing great, so i doubt its something with the water (all params test fine anyway) any ideas why this little fella would keep doing this? is shows no other signs of trauma, no bites, no melting or anything. just keeps loosing legs.
 

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I don't know, Andy. I had a star that quit eating, lots legs, and then died :(

BUT - I remember reading a thread a few months back about someone else that had such and problem, and put the star in a quarentine tank, and the star got better.

Good luck!
 

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Mine lost legs and the next thing I know I have about five new stars. New stars started growing from the legs.
 

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Sir Master Deuter the 3rd
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Reproduction





Starfish are capable of both sexual and asexual reproduction. Individual starfish are male or female. Fertilization takes place externally, both male and female releasing their gametes into the environment. Resulting fertilized embryos form part of the zooplankton.
Starfish are developmentally (embryologically) known as deuterostomes. Their embryo initially develops bilateral symmetry, indicating that starfish probably share a common ancestor with the chordates, which includes the fish. Later development takes a very different path however as the developing starfish settles out of the zooplankton and develops the characteristic radial symmetry. Some species reproduce cooperatively, using environmental signals to coordinate the timing of gamete release; in other species, one to one pairing is the norm.
Some species of starfish also reproduce asexually by fragmentation, often with part of an arm becoming detached and eventually developing into an independent individual starfish. This has led to some notoriety. Starfish can be pests to fishermen who make their living on the capture of clams and other mollusks at sea as starfish prey on these. The fishermen would presumably kill the starfish by chopping them up and disposing of them at sea, ultimately leading to their increased numbers until the issue was better understood. A starfish arm can only regenerate into a whole new organism if some of the central ring of the starfish is part of the chopped off arm.
 

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as long as the legs/starfish are moving around i would leave them in the tank to see if they survive. most of the time when stars loose their legs like that it is a sign of bad acclimation somewhere along the chain to your tank. this can include you, but it is also just as likely that a distributor or the LFS did not acclimate properly.

G~
 

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Sir Master Deuter the 3rd
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oh I thought it might be the star reproducing actually, never know
 

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I agree more along the lines of Geoff's comment regarding improper acclimitizatioin somewhere along the chain of custody regarding the salinity swings when transporting sea star specimens. This is most likely in this type of full-bodied Asteroid (Including Fromia, Linckia, and relted spp. when in captivity. Until you can document that the specimens have had good tranport conditions, it is more likely that they specimen is dieing to to osmotic rupture of the hydrovascular membranes due to sudden changes in salinity rather than spontaneous asexual reroduction via fission, which is unlikely in these sea stars even under good conditions.

HTH, see fissiparous reproduction in Asterina spp. sea stars for more informatiion re: asexual reroductioin via fission.
 

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Yep, stars are most sensitive to salinity changes. Even if the star looked good when you got it, the damage may have been done long before. It can take a while for the star to exhibit the symptoms. Best thing to do is to have the LFS hold the star for a couple weeks. If it still looks good after a period, you can get it, and make sure to acclimate it slowly over a period of several hours.

Hopefully it can survive... is it eating?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
im not sure if its eating, it isnt breaking off with part of the central disc attached, so a assume its the bad version of loosing legs, is there anything that can be done? or at this point is the damage to far along? i know i took a good 3-4 hours of dripping before dropping him in the tank, but even then, it may not have been enough. i hope the little guy makes it though, he's cool.
 

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Andy, the damage may have already been done before you received the specimen, not anything to do once thi type of damage has occurred, just hope the damage was not too extensive and that they (the rays) will recover. I have seen one recover (rarely), but it is few and far between that do recover once the ambulacral system has been ruptured.

Sorry.
 
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