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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am getting some red slime in my 28 gallon aquarium. It isn't too bad, but I don't like it of course, and I don't want any more. What is the best method for removal? I know certain hermit crabs eat it. Would a tuxedo urchin eat it? I have a UV sterilizer, does that kill cyanobacteria? And I know there are a few red slime removal products out there, but I want to know if they are safe. I never use algaecides for my freshwater aquariums because they are full of nasty chemicals. Do these red slime removal products contain stuff like that? Thanks!
 

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your best bet is syphoning it out and trying to find the source of it. Im going through it now.
 

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I just got burnt bad w/ red slime. I was "experimenting" on reducing my dosages of RowaPhos to see what I could get away w/ to save costs. At the same time (and unknown to me), I was developing a lighting problem. Short story- the redslime took off in a short period (no matter how much was removed by siphoning)- all the gravel had to be removed. I used Ultra Life Red Slime Remover just to get ahead of the problem; w/ no ill effects to the corals. If you have some slime, look for the cause first and don't worry about who eats it. Like I said, it doesn't take long for things to go from bad to worse, and it takes even longer to remedy the problem.
 

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You can usually still siphon it off by hovering just above the sand. You should be vacuuming the sand anyway. If you're not, that's likely part of the reason you're having this problem. If something like a python is too strong, use a turkey baster to suck it up.
 

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I just got burnt bad w/ red slime. I was "experimenting" on reducing my dosages of RowaPhos to see what I could get away w/ to save costs. At the same time (and unknown to me), I was developing a lighting problem. Short story- the redslime took off in a short period (no matter how much was removed by siphoning)- all the gravel had to be removed. I used Ultra Life Red Slime Remover just to get ahead of the problem; w/ no ill effects to the corals. If you have some slime, look for the cause first and don't worry about who eats it. Like I said, it doesn't take long for things to go from bad to worse, and it takes even longer to remedy the problem.
how long does it take to take effect and how do you tell if it is dying??
 

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It takes about 2 days to notice a difference. I believe it started turning dark, then just let go. Remove any dead slime w/ a net asap- you probably don't want to siphon to remove or you'll end up removing the mediction as well. But again, I used it to get ahead of a problem, not to cure it. You have to find the source of the phosphates or you're just going to be chasing your tail. I agree w/ the other post- its probably in your gravel and will start to wick up into your rock if you don't address it. You may end up replacing your gravel. Also, you may want to check your lights, make sure they're not too old and giving off a spectrum that's favored by the red slime.
 

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red slime is cyano bacteria - buy some nass. snails to stirr up the sandbed 1 per 10 gallon they will eat the excess waste - make sure you have a good skimmer and cut back on how much you feed your fish and what you are feeding them might be the problem

good house keeping on your tank will starve it to death
 

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Nothing eats Cyano. As long as nutrients are under control use Chemi-clean exactly as directed.
 

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Trochus and conch snails are commonly known to consume cyanobacteria.

However, you need to find and fix the problem. The 3 main causes are:

Lighting-Either age of lamps or choice of spectrum can be the problem.
Flow-Most tanks have far too little.
Nutrients-Filtration,feeding,water changes,etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My tank is 1 1/2 months old. I have a new 150 watt hqi system on it so its not the lights.
I have 2 tunze powerheads that alternate flow (500 gph) in addition to the return pump on the filter, so its not the flow.
I feed daily brine shrimp to my two clownfish. They eat all of the food that i give them. About 3-5 shrimp per fish (theyre small) and I make 30% water changes weekly. Phosphates are stable at 0.25 ppm. The only lapse i have in filtration is my skimmer which is terrible because I own a biocube. i am in the process of getting a better one that fits. But the slime isnt bad - only small patches on rocks and sand. It hasnt gotten worse for about 5 days now.
 

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Did you remove the bioballs from the back of the Biocube? If you have liverock in the tank, you don't need anything except the pump in the rear chamber of the Biocube.
 

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Astrea snails are listed as eaters.
Trochus and conch snails are commonly known to consume cyanobacteria.
Yes, yes, those are the claims, however in my years of practical experience nothing like those mentioned actually do eat Cyano.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have no bioballs in my tank.
The filtration i have is:
35 lbs of live rock (29 gallon aquarium),
A refugium that has a few lbs of live rock in it and some macro algae,
A 3 watt uv sterilizer,
50-micron filter pads,
Chemi pure and some nitrate removal stuff by seachem
 
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