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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the lightingh, the bacteria, and the size required to have the potential to br a beautiful reef tank. I have a 125 gallon and I recently bought two pairs of clownfish. They get along now but I want to get anemones to get them to avoid aggressive behavior later on. I am a nube at marine tanks and am also only fourteen. I was told that I needed ro water to ave corals. I had been using tapcwater with a dechlorinator. I have about 40 gallina of puré water. My first cuestión is this: how lona must i wate in between water chantes? I had one two days Ago for 15 gl and now i ave 40. I need to finish this change from tapvto puré water. My secon cuestión is this: my tank has a lot of whar semen to be some sort of Algae. Is it good or bad? The Fish seem to enjoy it Fish aré 4 clownfish and court yellowtail damsels. My this cuestión is: can i have 2 anemones inthe sale tank? And my las question is: wat do i feed my anemones when i jet them? Sorry for typos this is hard to do on an iPod.
 

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The need for RO/DI water depends on your tap water. If it has a high Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) rating such as 20+ ppm (the national average is like 350 ppm), go with the RO/DI unit. Some people are more picky about the water and won't use water for coral that has a TDS of 10+ ppm. I use an Ro/DI unit for my water thats around 20-30 ppm. 20% water changes should be made weekly but it's imperative that while doing this you keep the parameters steady. Saltwater fish, inverts, and coral particularly wild ones are used to steady conditions. As for the algae what color is it? Brown diatom algae is often present when starting up a tank and should go away. Whats the color/is it fuzzy or just a coating/does it have air bubbles trapped beneath it etc.? Algae is often present with phosphate and nitrate so check to make sure that they are as low as possible - preferably 0ppm. Anemones will sting each other but you have a 125 gallon tank which is more than enough space to separate the anemones. Be sure to give corals and anemones their space because they can be aggressive, some more than others. Feed anemones stuff like chopped shrimp or half a silverside once a week. Hope this helps and the best of luck to you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The algae is a brown color , but I also have some green hairy grasslookingthing on the sides of the tAnk. I also have some sort of sponge type thing building up on the live rock. My question about the water was, do I have to wait to docthe water change or can just do it as soon as I have enough water?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh, the brown algae is coating the glass, but on the live rock it looks very hairy and tangled up. It is spreading fast. How do I clean it? I don't like to uSe the algae scraper because it scratches the glass. The green algae is almost growing as If it were a plant.
 

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The brown algae is diatoms. A normal part to the beginning cycles of a new tank. And the alge sounds like hair algae.you have hair algae from the phosphates in your tank. Your getting the phosphates in your tank from the tap water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My tank has been working for a month. I did the water change and nothing happened. When I say wait I don't really mean wait for anything. Just something I am used to saying.
 

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I assume when you say that nothing happened you mean that the phosphate and nitrate levels remain the same and that the algae is still there. That is probably because your tap water has a little phosphate and nitrate in it. That is where RO/DI units come in. If you want to remove all of that unneeded and potentially harmful stuff from your water you need the unit. The algae won't go away immediately. Diatom algae is present where excess nutrients are abundant. So long as there is phosphate and nitrate there will most likely be algae. Try testing your water for phosphate and nitrate if anything shows up, thats part of the reason why your parameters arent changing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i do not have a current test kit but i am planning on buying one again soon. my current one has expired. i have changed 50% of dechlorinated tap water to RO water. i am planning one or two more water changes and i shall be done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
nothing yet. i have a lot of chemicals that came with the aquarium, but i do not know what they are for. they are all kent marine. the ones given to me where: iodine, chromaplex, strontium & molybdenum, phytoplex, micro Vert, tech-i, and liquid calcium. i also have some reef iodide, raises trontium, and calcium. what are they for?
 

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Those bottles you have should tell you what they are for. Kent always has a little paragraph about the product on the bottle itself. Honestly, you don't really need most of that. What you need is a great test kit (ph, kh, calcium, magnesium, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, iodine etc.) and a great salt mix. Your salt mix should give you everything you need. Test your water often, and if you need something, calcium for instance, add calcium. Unless you test for it, don't add it, and only add it if you need it. Otherwise you will have excess nutrients that will lead to a lot of problems. I keep a buffer on hand and I add magnesium. I have never had to use the buffer, but I use the magnesium often because I always have too little magnesium in my tank. The phytoplex, and micro vert are plankton additives (I'm guessing based on their names). You will need to add this to feed certain corals or sea fans or other filter feeding inhabitants. Hope this helps.
PS You will spend a lot of money on test kits (I like Red Sea's test kits) but they are needed in order for your reef to thrive. For instance just the magnesium kit costs around 30 dollars same with the iodine, etc, etc.
 

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I think trace elements additives are a waste because salt gives you all of that. Also, the best way to replenish your tanks nutrients is to do a water change. Salt carries all of the needed nutrients, so replacing old water with new saltwater is very important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Oh. I thoughtbthey were food for corals and inverts. I use instant ocean sea salt in the beginning. In the last water change I was forced to use the same because I had ran out of salt and my tank was a quarter empty. I plan on using reef salt in my next water change.
 

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I wouldn't use reef salt until you are 3 weeks away from adding coral which based on how old your tank is should be a while. You should wait about 2 months before adding mushroom coral, 3 months before adding soft coral, six months before adding lps corals or anemones, and about a year before you add any sps corals. You need to let the aquarium water mature and stabilize.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
do i need reef salt for a tank with a few corals? or is the other salt all right too? and another thing, i realized that when i came back from my vacation today, there were a lot of green algae apart from the brown. and it seems to also be growing as a plant, not just spots on the glass.
 

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I would use reef salt with corals. Does the algae look like scraggly green fur. If so, its hair algae, also common in starting up new tanks. The best way to get rid of it is to add emerald crabs, nerite snails or other hair algae eating stuff. Sailfin tangs are supposed to eat it, but you need to do extra research on them befor eyou try to keep one.
 
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