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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I was going to get a 5g dwarf seahorse tank. The problem was I could care for them but when I went away no one I know would be able to keep them. So I'm not getting an dwarf seahorse tank, but an ORA Captive Breed Seahorse tank. I am getting a 13.6" x 13.8" x 24.8" (24.8" high) Aqueon 15 Column tank. Can I drill this tank on my own with a "paddle bit" or a "hole saw". I was thinking about connecting this tank to my 40b (55 gallons of water) and this tank would also be my display refugium. Or would this tank be better of on its own. Also, I will be using a full spectrum T5 lighting. And does anyone have any recommendations for macro algae the seahorses would like, I was looking into mangroves.

Ps: PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE don't tell me this tank is too small for captive breed seahorses.
 

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CONSTANTLY LEARNING
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WHY NOT tell you it's too small for seahorses? That is the truth.
If you don't care for seahorses in the best known way possible, you end up costing THEIR lives, not yours.
The most respected seahorse breeder in the USA, Dan Underwood of seahorsesource.com, has even now been recommending that instead of 30g for first pair and 15g more for each additional pair, to instead have 30g for all pairs of seahorses as people doing so end up more successful.
I'm asking you to PLEASE do much more research BEFORE you buy any seahorses as they are NOT like any other marine fish and have special needs for BEST chances of survival.
For instance, the seahorses are very susceptible to problems from pathogens they pick up by exposure to other fish, especially starting from store or wholesaler integrated systems.
Probably their most vulnerable point is their poor tolerance to nasty bacteria like the vibrio species for instance. They need much larger volumes of water, even more than we thought needed ten years ago, with better flow, better husbandry, larger and more frequent water changes. Mechanical filtration needs to be cleaned VERY often before decomposition provides food and bedding for the nasty bacteria. We keep tropical seahorses between 68° and 74°F to aid in control of the bacteria which multiply exponentially for each degree above that range.
You can increase your knowledge of seahorsekeeping by becoming a member of [b]http://www.seahorse.org[/b]/ for the extensive forums there, and [b]http://fusedjaw.com/[/b] for the more up to date articles there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This wouldn't be their permanent home. Sometime in a couple of years (probably this fall/winter), I will be upgrading my 40g to a hundred gallon and this 15g to a 40g. Also, The seahorse's will be about 1/4 into 1/2 an inch where I'm getting them from so I want to be able to see them. Then This tank will be a refugium. Also, Im only getting 2 seahorses to start.
 

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I don't know who is storying who, but someone isn't being straight up here.
I don't know of ANY reputable breeder selling standard seahorses at 1/4 to 1/2 inch in size. If they did, the survival rate would be dismal at best.
I'd bet anything that ORA seahorses would not be released for sale at that point so if a store is telling you seahorses that size are from ORA, it's just not true.
The size you are talking is dwarf size which you have already dismissed as a purchase. Even then I've never had dwarfs sold to me at 1/4".
Sometime in a couple of years (probably this fall or winter)
Even this fall or winter is not soon enough. The odds are the seahorses could be dead by then.
Also, it's been my experience that plans get derailed and it's a good possibility your upgrade to larger size won't happen when you plan for it.
Without a large sump, the 40g tank even is not really suitable for more than one pair. I have 4 fourty gallon tanks with 20g sumps and have learned the hard way over the years, to not put more than one pair in those.
It sounds to me like you are looking for someone to tell you that what you WANT to do, is OK, rather than do proper research that shows it would NOT be best for the seahorses.
If you are a young person, take into account the expenses involved in buying and keeping medicines that should be on hand for emergencies, like Furan II and prescription required Diamox. Having them on hand often means the difference between saving a seahorse or loosing it.
You will go through more salt than for a reef tank because of larger more frequent water changes necessary for best chances of survival.
A protein skimmer rated for 3-5 times tank size is an item certain to increase chances of success and they are not cheap for one that actually works well. But, they can marginally reduce the size of the frequent water changes and reduce the incidences of bacterial infections.
 

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CONSTANTLY LEARNING
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I know they are not dwarfs, and now i know they are NOT ORA seahorses either. Offspring of ORA seahorses born in an LFS system are not ORA.
ORA would NEVER sell seahorses at 1/4 to 1/2 inch in size. I suspect the MINIMUM size they would sell at would be 2 1/2 to 3".
I'm assuming the $30 was for offspring because ORA seahorses would have to be sold for more than that if they are going through an LFS so if the adults are $30, then ask to see the paper work that shows they are ORA. Not all LFS's are honest about seahorse sources although sometimes they have been misled by the distributor they purchase from.
Now, for buying the offspring, it would most likely be a waste of money because without experience, the odds of them getting to maturity is slim.
As for posting that U tube link, it is NOT going to boost your side of the argument just because someone else has not done their homework. What he shows in that U tube is not a seahorse lifetime, and, it's almost guaranteed they won't live 5 years or more in his tank and lucky to make it for a year.
PLEASE, do the RIGHT thing and leave purchasing seahorses until such time as you can provide the BEST chances of success for them.
 
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