The Reef Tank banner
41 - 60 of 163 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,818 Posts
Discussion Starter · #41 ·
so the water to the sump comes in from the top of the reactor???? I suppose it has a one way??/ I bought it used working from a big tank....Ill post pics of the co2 tank later...the bubble counter...also I calibrated the controller to match my ph monitor??? it has a calibration button on it and my ph monitor read 8.34 so I set the ph controller from 8.6 to 8.34????I hop this is right???? now how will the controller know when to shut the co2 bottle off? I understand the bo0ttle has a selenoid on it...but how does the selenoid know when to shut off????there is a line coming from the bubble reactor on the co2 bottle to the reactor)you said the small nipple on the bottom) the only other cord on the co2 bottle is a power cord for the selenoid????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,818 Posts
Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Check again to make sure that the solenoid is plugged into your pH controller into the controlled outlet


ok I see the cord coming from the selenoid plugs into the big square controller plug...it has a place to plug another cord in the back...I guess when the controller drops below a certain level the big square plug shuts off shutting off the selenoid....but why are you guys saying set at 6.7 when my ph is 8.3?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,818 Posts
Discussion Starter · #45 ·
quote"and the reactor injector with a one-way valve (anti-backup) to prevent water from entering the regulator when the gas turns off, that you have the bubble chamber filled with bubble fluid (try using Glycerin up to about 5/8TH'S full), and that the needle valve is closed. VERY SLOWLY tighten the regulator


how will I know If it has one????it has been used in another tank for 6 months??
 

·
Why I get nothing done...
Joined
·
3,502 Posts
Whew, I think things just got a bit complicated. I think you can assume your reactor injector has a one way valve. I wouldn't worry about it. I personally didn't understand most of what Tom posted. To put this in plain English:

When they talk about setting the PH to be 6.7, they are talking about the water coming out of the reactor not the water in your tank. I personally don't do it by measuring my PH, but I don't have a PH monitor myself. I set mine using Alkalinity. The water coming out of the reactor is referred to as 'effluent' water. You set your reactor by measuring either the Alkalinity or the PH of the effluent water. The PH and Alkalinity of the effluent will slowly change the PH and Alk of the tank but it takes some time since the effluent is coming out at a slow rate. That's why they recommend waiting a week to make any adjustments to your reactor.
After a week, take measurements of your tank water to see how the PH and Alkalinity is doing. This is what I do. I try to shoot for Alk to be around 10-12. Then I make adjustments to my reactor accordingly to raise or lower.
If my Alk is too high, I either lower the CO2 or raise the flow of the effluent. If the Alk is too low, vice versa.
You don't need to get so carried away with the proper procedures for the CO2 bottle. Just crack open the valve on the bottle, then adjust your bubble count for around 1 bubble per second. That's a good starting point. Hope that helps. Feel free to correct me anyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
Maybe some pictures will help. This is my GEO. A little different design from the MRC, but all the basic components should be the same.



In the picture, the black tube coming up from the lower right is the CO2 feed. It feeds into the bubble counter on the left. The water feed from the tank is hidden behind the top of the reactor, but it comes in on the opposite side of the vertical black and white pipe opposite the bubble counter.

The output from the reactor is the black tube coming out of the white pipe, which reaches up and over the top of the reactor. The black and white pipe itself, of course, is the main circulation line for the reactor. The reactor pump is sitting out of the picture frame, below the bubble counter. So, there are two input lines: one from the tank and one from the CO2 bottle, and one output line back to the tank.



The solenoid is a very simple setup. Pressure gage for the CO2 bottle on the left, (should measure around 1100 psi). Pressure gage after the regulator on the right (should measure around 20 to 30 psi). Little silver and black contraption down and to the right of the pressure gages is the solenoid, which will cut off the flow of CO2 if the power goes out. To the right of that is the needle valve and the output black tubing to the reactor.

No pH probes in this setup. No need for any.



The input and output of water from the reactor is partially gravity fed and partially pump fed. In my sump I have two different water levels. The water feed into the reactor is the clear tube near the back of the sump going up and over the side and to the left. The return from the reactor is the green tube. The end of the green tube leads right into the opening for the main return pump to the tank. The combination of change in water level and suction from the return pump keeps the water flowing. The green tube also has a little black valve, which allows me to control how fast the water is being sucked out of the reactor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,818 Posts
Discussion Starter · #48 ·
cool...im starting to understand ( a little) but I guess I need to understand how to set my ph controller....I understand that the ph controllerhas a ph reading on it thats the ph in the reactor going into the sump...set around 6.7 but it has a calibration setting on it for the probe?? what do I set the calibration at? Im assuming 6.7 ? that way it will only come on if it drops below that? but does it really matter the setting? If you calibrate to 8.3 when it drops below that the co2 will kick on...if you calibrate the controller to 8.3?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,818 Posts
Discussion Starter · #49 ·
cool...im starting to understand ( a little) but I guess I need to understand how to set my ph controller....I understand that the ph controllerhas a ph reading on it thats the ph in the reactor going into the sump...set around 6.7 but it has a calibration setting on it for the probe?? what do I set the calibration at? Im assuming 6.7 ? that way it will only come on if it drops below that? but does it really matter the setting? If you calibrate to 8.3 when it drops below that the co2 will kick on...if you calibrate the controller to 8.3?
well I found this....do you calibrate the controller by fluid???I turned the calibration button???

Milwaukee Calibration Fluid

SOLUTIONS
Milwaukee standard calibration solutions are available in 220ml bottles and 20ml sachets.
Traditional buffer solutions are packed in 220ml leak-proof bottles and are recommended for lab application.
Sachets are sealed against light and air and are ideal for on-the-spot calibration. Simply open, insert the tester or electrode into the sachet and calibrate. Sachets are sold in boxes of 25
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
When someone sets their calcium reactors by measuring pH, it's like setting the cruise control on a car by measuring gasoline consumption.

"I was racing down I-75 this morning at 6 liters per hour. I've never gone that fast before, but I was late for work."

6-liters per hour?

Why not just say you were going 80 miles per hour?

Whether you focus on pH or effluent alk, or a combination of both, during the initial setup is a personal choice, and you could argue that you can't set "cruise control" on a calcium reactor by measuring effluent alkalinity and volume, since there are no convenient probes and meters to measure those two quantities.

But, in the initial setup "cruise control" shouldn't matter. You may be making a number of adjustments to flow rates and bubble counts to get everything right.

After the initial setup, if you want to use pH to set "cruise control" it's may be a valuable thing to do. It's just not something I would focus on during the initial tuning phase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,818 Posts
Discussion Starter · #54 ·
ok here she is I got it up and running...media is soaking in ro water....then Ill put the media in seawater to soak.....any way....does this llok right..pressure tested no leakes so far..



I put the pump going to the reactor in the return(is this ok to do??)



the line from the top of the reactor going in the sump






 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,818 Posts
Discussion Starter · #55 ·
ok....Im hooking up the ph controller I know I should wait...but im trying to get the concept down>>>>the probe is best where??? and the ph of the reactor is the ph of the monitor right? thats why it is lower than the tank??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,379 Posts
Sorry to have missed the "disussion" regarding the setup of the probe in your setup, I've been out of touch for a few days.

You will need to set up a probe holder for your pH controller if you intend to use the controller to keep your pH of the circulating (recirculating) fluid at the 6.7 pH . Contrary to previous comments, this is the most accurate way to keep your tank from experiencing CO2 initiated swings resulting from excesses in delivered CO2 into the tank from the reactor. The only problem with your equipment is that the Milwaukee controller has its own issues regarding swings in accuracy and reliability in calibration. My experiences with then in the past has lead me to using the Pinpoints only now for controllers and pH measurements in the tank.

Let's get setup first. The reactor you're using is a single chambered Ca++ reactor, and as such will need some means of measuring the pH of the fluid circulating in the reactor to use the controller to measure the pH of the solution. You can do this by one of two ways, either by inserting the probe into the chamber with a probe holder (many issues with this method), or by making an in-line probe holder to measure the pH of the effluent before it has a chance to "de-gas" the CO2 content when it is exposed to room air (the preferred and easiest to do method). This means that we will need to build a small devide to hold the probe in the line. We will come back to this later. There are photos of both methods in the "Skeety..." thread


I don't have the time to do this tonight, but I will post something tomorrow on the topic, meanwhile, see http://thereeftank.com/forums/showthread.php?t=65873 and read the entire thread, as well as THIS .PDF for the MRC Ca reactor assembly instructions.

By pressing the calibrate button for the probe while in seawater, your meter is so far off calibration it will not work anything close to what you need, so you can forget using it until you calibrate the meter. You need to get the Milwaukee 7.01 calibration solution, immerse the probe in it, and then press the calibrate button. See the Milwaukee site for more info on the meter/controller calibration.

HTH for now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,818 Posts
Discussion Starter · #58 ·
also my media looks like sand...is this the right media??? also when I turn on the reactor and all that media water goes in the tank(pure white) what happens???
 

·
Why I get nothing done...
Joined
·
3,502 Posts
Reactor media can look like sand, depending on what kind it is. There is some stuff that is about the size of cat food or just regular stuff that looks like aragonite sand. That's what I have. The way Tom is describing is probably the most accurate way BUT yes you do have to go to the trouble of figuring out a way of getting a probe into your effluent. I don't have a controller or PH monitor so I don't have any reason to do it that way. That's the reason I'm just checking my tank water every week or so. Your probe will have to be removed periodically to be cleaned and calibrated too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,818 Posts
Discussion Starter · #60 ·
why wouldnt this work????the effluent flow from the to of the reactor down to the tube and before it comes out it hits the probe????

 
41 - 60 of 163 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top