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Man i am suppose to go to the lfs this weekend and was gonna pick up an emerald crab since my 10g had green bubble algae. Well one side has green and the other has red.. at first i thought it was just some color showing on the rock then it was the whole rock and an old coral skele.. *the skele had featherdusters on it no idea if it does now * its starting to bubble up . so my question is will an emerald crab eith both these or is there something else that might do a better job. Id perfer a living creature that doesnt jsut live off the algae. I dont have any other then coraline in my display tank and i canhardly use this as my qt tank if its covered in algae. please help
 

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im not positive on this but depending on how bad it is i dont think just the crab is going to help all that much, did you use RO water when you setup the tank? exzactly how bad is the problem? is it covering the entire tank??
 

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hmm honestly i assumed it was red bubble cause it is a red coat on just one live rock but its bubling up.. reminds me of water drops hanging from a ceiling but in reverse lol ill take a pic when i get home and show u but its just one rock and the *dead* coral on top of it. only thing in the tank is a few pieces of lr some hitchhikers *sponges, feather dusters, snails* and a damsel. oh there is some one the flooring no sand yet. and some green bubble on the left side like 4 or 5 bubbles.

Also it is the same water as my tank i added 10g from my display then about a week ago changed out 5g with ro/di water. i always use ro./di water.
 

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hmm honestly i assumed it was red bubble cause it is a red coat on just one live rock but its bubling up.. reminds me of water drops hanging from a ceiling but in reverse ... ...there is some one the flooring no sand yet. and some green bubble on the left side like 4 or 5 bubbles.
Sounds like cyanobacteria, results from buildups of phosphate (and on occasion, nitrates). Pix will help

Cyano can usually fix nitate from atmospheric-sourced nitrogen gas, so nitrates testing is usually of little benefit for these blooms, however, nitrate in the water resulting from cyano growths (and the indirect indication that phosphate came from the old tank water) can feed a bloom of Valonia spp. Try siphoning out the cyanobacterial biomass at the end of your daily photoperid, as well as removing all the Valonia bubbles you can find. Try bumping up the "wetness" of your skimmate for a few days each week, and watch for dropping salinity on a daily basis while wet skimming (best to turn off the ATO if you use one while doing this). By siphoning out the cyanobacteria biomass, you remove all the phosphate they have captured during the day, same for the Vaonia, and simply the act of wet skimming and siphoning both remove water from your system that contains phosphate or suspended detritus; all these tasks remove total misc. forms of phsophate from your system, and replacing what volume you siphon out and skim out of the tank with clean fresh ASW will help dilute the remaining phosphate.


Dropping phosphate (as well as excesses of nitrate) will bring these blooms under control, then undertaking regular husbandry that reduces detritus 9rock blasting with a turkey baster or owerhead on a stick) and nitrate in the system, while minimizing import of algal nutrients, will further limit these bliooms.


HTH
 
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