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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey hey hey ... i just want to know if my simple understanding below is correct or incorrect.

Blue: is just for human to see the colourful contrasting colours of corals but it doesn't grow corals as much as the white does. Aesthetic in a word.

White: is to grow corals.

Incorrect statement?
 

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flip it around. corals use more of the blue white and humans use more of the white.

but take that with a grain of salt, corals can utilize a lot of the light spectrum, however blue light is more useful then white light.

check this thread and the links provided to learn a lot about how corals utilize the light spectrum:
http://www.thereeftank.com/forums/f6/what-color-leds-do-you-use-221464.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good one Phanesoul ... i was incorrect.

In general (taking out the PAR spectrum etc):
Blue is more for Coral growth.
White is more for Human's eye.
 

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and I have a wrench to throw :)

if you set up an all actinic tank, the corals are dead in a year

if you set up an all white tank, they ain't but you have more algae to deal with


so theory is theory, and then in application our whites work better for growth
 

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and I have a wrench to throw :)

if you set up an all actinic tank, the corals are dead in a year

if you set up an all white tank, they ain't but you have more algae to deal with

so theory is theory, and then in application our whites work better for growth
Depends on the way the 'application' is worked out.
Care to explain why all 420nm could lead to coral death and with white light they will survive?
 

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zacharY
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Blue, violet, and UV light all best grow most corals. Every important photopigment for zooxanthellae (the algae-like flagellate which lives in corals and provides them with the food they need), namely chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c2, and peridinin, all rely on these colors of light. Red light also grows some corals well, but other corals which naturally aren't exposed to red light may have their growth stunted by red light. White light is used over reef tanks purely for the aquarists' benefit - not the corals'. The green, yellow, and orange components of white light do not help corals' zooxanthellae photosynthesize. Rather, these colors of light are great for creating a clear, crisp picture for us humans to see because we see green and yellow light best. This is the case because much of our recent evolution took place in the plains of Africa, where the ability to see the greens and yellows common in the grasslands in better detail was very beneficial to our survival. Check out the Zooxanthellae link in my signature for some more info, including links and pictures to/from scientific articles.
 

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Blue, violet, and UV light all best grow most corals. Every important photopigment for zooxanthellae (the algae-like flagellate which lives in corals and provides them with the food they need), namely chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c2, and peridinin, all rely on these colors of light. Red light also grows some corals well, but other corals which naturally aren't exposed to red light may have their growth stunted by red light. Check out the Zooxanthellae link in my signature for some more info, including links and pictures to/from scientific articles.
So why can they die with just actnics?

from what I know its because colored led's only cover one part of the spectrum, actnics are 420nm, hyper violet is 430. but corals need a broader part of the light spectrum. white light covers more then just oh say 420nm-430nm. however for optimal growth white light doesn't give off enough PUR. actnics do however give off a more usable part of the spectrum promoting a lot of growth.

you probably cant keep coral alive with just an actnic light. but if you left out white lights and went with a red led, royal blue, lime, cyan, hyper violet, violet and a blue led I bet you would be able to keep and grow corals better then with a white light and actnics.
 

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zacharY
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So why can they die with just actnics?

from what I know its because colored led's only cover one part of the spectrum, actnics are 420nm, hyper violet is 430. but corals need a broader part of the light spectrum. white light covers more then just oh say 420nm-430nm. however for optimal growth white light doesn't give off enough PUR. actnics do however give off a more usable part of the spectrum promoting a lot of growth.

you probably cant keep coral alive with just an actnic light. but if you left out white lights and went with a red led, royal blue, lime, cyan, hyper violet, violet and a blue led I bet you would be able to keep and grow corals better then with a white light and actnics.
Yep yep yep. In fact, there is an reef LED fixture manufacturer that does not use any white LEDs. They're called Pacific Sun. Their stuff is quite a bit more expensive than I could probably justify, but their concept will probably grow in popularity over time.
 

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oh is that so? have you seen the color produced in person? when I upgrade my led's im going to use every color beneficial. ive also been pondering on if you could put 2 potentiometers on one circuit. something I wanna research in preparation for my upgrade. I fear without multi potentiometers on each channel (at least on 3 drivers) driver costs will become way too high for me to do 1 driver per channel. im also going to look into a DIY controler. if I can make one for 100$ I would be game. I only have knowledge of how to make a basic led string so I don't know how controllers work or being able to control brightness of each channel using less drivers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
so hypothetically saying, if I do the following 2 scenarios (let's take Kessil A360 as an example):

Scenario #1:
100% blue for 12 hours period.

Scenario #2:
100% white for 12 hours period.

Corals in scenario #1 will outgrow corals in scenario #2 ?

Corals growth goes hand in hand to Corals happiness :)
 

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I doubt it. scenario #1 is only providing 1 color in the light spectrum. although it is a very useful light, they cannot survive with just one.

scenario #2 is providing many colors in the spectrum, but not enough of the light spectrum the corals can more readily utilize to show thriving growth. however some non-led light fixtures can achieve this quite well

also I am taking into account scenario #2 is just white light as I don't know or have ever worked with a kessil and do not know the specs on the light they provide.
 

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zacharY
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so hypothetically saying, if I do the following 2 scenarios (let's take Kessil A360 as an example):

Scenario #1:
100% blue for 12 hours period.

Scenario #2:
100% white for 12 hours period.

Corals in scenario #1 will outgrow corals in scenario #2 ?

Corals growth goes hand in hand to Corals happiness :)
Yes, the corals in scenario #1 will outgrow those in scenario #2. Colors of light other than UV, violet, and blue do not help at all with zooxanthellae photosynthesis, and therefore are not necessary. The only exception is red light, but most of the corals found in this hobby are from waters deeper than 10 meters, where there is no red light to be found. If exposed to red light, some scientific studies suggest that these corals' growth is stunted because the corals believe that they are in the dangerous intertidal zone. Just think of all the pictures you've seen of corals in the wild. The light they're exposed to is almost all blue, violet, and UV. This becomes more and more true as you go deeper (and higher wavelengths of light stop penetrating the water).
 

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'm looking at the ABI 12 watt par38's for my 10g nano reef. im mostly looking to grow zoas, sofites, and lps from the euphyllia family, but i do like the idea of maybe stopping into lfs and picking up some other random lps coral every once in a while. They have one thats half white and half blue, and another thats all blue. their non controllable and non dimmable, so i was thinking of getting one of the mixed and one of the blue, to be able to control blue from white. by changing which ones i plug in. would this work, or would their being only one of each make the coverage shady? should i just go with two mixed? and what would be the best placesment if i get a white and a blue to make them seem as if their both over the center when only ones turned on, and could i turn both the whtie and blue on during day, or would the blue over power it? sorry for the long question but i only wanna do this once i wanna make sure i do it right
 
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