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Hi again
So I may have found my dream tank with everything including established coral and live rock in Bloomington, MN from someone who is not into the hobby anymore. The problem is that I am a total newbie to the hobby and do not have a clue about transport/keeping fish, rock, coral, crabs alive and then setting this thing up. We are worried that we won't set up the stuff correctly, etc. I am able to borrow a pickup so that is taken care of. The tank is a 72g bowfront. If ANYONE has advice it would be greatly appreciated. My husband and I are afraid we will destroy everything.
The move would be Rochester to Bloomington.
Thanks,
TK:read: "studying hard"
 

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Sometimes one of the local pet shops will house them for you for a week or so, usually 4 a fee, but you'd also need it to be one you trust, If you can find one it'll let you take your time a bit to get things set up and ready, before you start throwing livestock in. just a thought.


jd
 

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RIP Steve Irwin
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Tara.......I have moved many tanks and it must be a start to finish project. How I found to do it best was this......I warn you ahead of time I am the king of "run on sentences" :lol:
On site of the new location I would have 15-20 gallons of new mixed salt water and a couple new bags of live sand depending on how old the tank is. If it is more than a year I would replace as the old sand will be filled with fish crap and such. Also decide where you will put it and make sure the sun does not shine directly on it.
First thing is to tear the old tank apart and remember this is an established eco system so the more you change as far as what was in the tank the more stressfull it can become for the inhibitants. I personally unplug it all and start taking out clean clear water before moving any of the rock out of the tank. When you move the rock it clouds the water and stirs up detritus and junk. Note you are saving this water in 5 gallon buckets as you remove it because you will use it again when you set up. The water is a huge part of the whole individual ecosystem that has established over time in the tank. Now remove the corals and bag them up in clear water as well. There will probably be some water in the bottom of the tank still for the fish but they will come out last. After the corals are bagged up and neatly stored in a cooler to keep optimal temp put the live rock in buckets without water and covar with saltwater soaked paper towels to keep in moisture or humidity. Now you can easily find the fish and put one in each bucket of salt water you took out that should be clear and if the sand is old throw it away and scrape out any coraline algae that may exist on the glass with a razor blade being careful of the seals. WHen you get to the new location put in new sand and stack rock how you like it after swishing it in a bucket of new salt water to remove dirty stuff. When you are done rinsing all the rock just throw this water out. Stack the rock how you want it and then add the old tank water and fish. Float the corals till the temp is back up then put them where you want them and add new heated salt water to the tank once all is into place. You really should know a bit more info like how to test salinity and make sure the temps are right so make sure you read up on this before you do anything as many things could lead to unwanted mishaps. Do not let this scare you but there is a required knowledge level involving the care and daily/weekly maintenance that can easily be obtained by reading a couple books and mabe even taking some notes. Good luck and if you have questions feel free to PM me. Steve
ps if it is a hundred degrees out do not plan an long stops. I reccommend drive through and eating on the road ha ha definately do not stap long enough for the car to heat up inside. Just a leason learned from a less inteligent friend ;)
 

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I will see if I have any good books left but I sold a bunch on ebay. If I find some I will let you know and get your address to mail them to you. (If any are left you can have them)
 

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smeese said:
live rock in buckets without water and covar with saltwater soaked paper towels to keep in moisture or humidity.
I suggest getting a 10pack of terry towels from Home Depot or the like. Soak them in SW to place over the LR for the drive. Paper Towels don't soak up the SW as good and will likely dry out before you get to your destination. Terry Towels work much better.

As for getting some SW premade ahead of time. Rubbermaid Brute Trash cans are food safe they run about $25 each at Home Depot. They also carry the wheels that fit the bottoms that make it handy to wheel around. I would at least buy 2 of them. You will always find a use for them in future.


Do you have anymore details about the setup you are purchasing. Is it drilled ? You really want a drilled tank. What skimmer, lights etc. does this system come with. Do you happen to know what the livestock includes. Perhaps can give you hints on what is more delicate than others.

Not to harp too much, but I really think your going to fast and should be asking more questions and researching more before you just jump right in. Planning is SO critical to the success. Choosing the right hardware, plumbing correctly for ease of maintenance etc.

Setups for sale come and go pretty often. I honestly think your rushing in and can really cost not only your pocket book for livestock fatalities also.
 

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smeese said:
I will see if I have any good books left but I sold a bunch on ebay. If I find some I will let you know and get your address to mail them to you. (If any are left you can have them)
Best book I know is called David Grigor...:agree:
They are looking into getting Frogbones old system.....NICE!
 

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ok she is wondering about how much rock and i was not so sure on what to tell her she was told about 1lbs per gal but i thought at one point i was told 2 to 2.5 lbs per gal sorry please someone chime in to help us both out with this question lol
 

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Land Shark
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Tara, when did you graduate from med school? Where'd you do your residency? I know I know you from somewhere along the way of med school/residency or something like that. I think you were my med student when I was an ENT resident.
Derek Schmidt


PS. I'm not hitting on her. :lol:
 

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If you stop at a local fish store, ie.. World of Fish or Something Fishy in Bloomington they may have some of the cardboard boxes with styrofoam liners they're willing to give or sell to you. If you need any I have 5 or 6 sitting in the basement. I wouldn't count on them holding water unless you use a really heavy duty trash bag as a liner... even then you may want to cushion jagged live rock edges with terry cloth or something like that so it doesn't puncture you're liner.

It's a lot of work to move a tank, but it's well worth it. As has been said before.. minimize any changes when you set the tank up again.. use as much of the old water that you can... and don't expect to get all the corals in just the right spot right away.. just get them back in the tank with the circulation.

one other thing I've learned from my experiences.. have plenty of old towels/ clean rags around to clean up any incidental spills or leaks. That's 58 gallons of water/ rock / coral you're moving.. you're bound to get some on the floor.. or in my case.. have a leaky pump when the fish store doesn't open for hours.. :-(

My last experience was today.. moved the contents of the 75 from the old house into the 180 I bought from Frogbone (Wolfgang) :) That's a whole 'nother thread though..
 

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Land Shark
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I also agree with what Grigor says. Moving a tank is not an easy undertaking, even for an experienced person. I would think it would be even more difficult for someone without much experience.

There are always cheap frags to get along the way, there are always systems for sale, and there is plenty of good advice to find here along the way.

If you can get some experienced help along the way, then this may be doable. You may also be better off having someone with an established tank hold onto your corals while you set up the tank, let it re-cycle, and read to figure out what you're doing. :) Most people will happily hold corals for others with the expectation of getting a frag here and there for their troubles. Heck, the "Schmidt Wayward home for corals" has almost stocked my tank. :funny:
 

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I saw the post of the system. I won't mention it here as not the place but PM me if you want to know what I think it's worth.

If you go ahead with the purchase, here are a few tid bits:

It's good that it's drilled.

Skimmer is decent sounds like it needs a good cleaning. Soak all the parts in some 50/50 of distilled white vinegar and water.

I would totally ditch any sandbed. Not only is it a pain to move and stinky but also one of the more risky to move without causing a major cycle or kill stuff. Buy some arago-live sand to replace it with. Probably only 1 or 2 bags max would do it.

Totatlly ditch the wet/dry thingy.

Looks like very little livestock so that make the move easier. It doesn't sound like the fish are worth much. May be better off not even trying to move them, find someone local that will take them. That would leave the LR and critters which shouldn't be very difficult to care of while your still learning.

MH creates a lot of heat, depending on your what temps you keep you house it may or may not be an issue. Keep a very close eye on tank temperatures for several days after setting up. This is probably also a good reason why should not try to move the fish.
 
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