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:funny: Hi I am new to the hobby and live in SE MN trying to get either a OCEANIC 70-90 gallon bowfront reef tank going. Any advice on where to get stuff? I went to WOF and they have an OCEANIC truckload sale this weekend?????????
I am reading like crazy. Kind of overwhelmed but getting used to terms like skimmer, sump, halide, etc. Hopefully getting a good deal on live rock that is cured from someone locally.

I have had a community tropical fish aquarium for about 20 years of my life and it is time to upgrade. I am an avid SCUBA diver so am looking forward to having some marine critters especially hermit crabs. (I am nuts I know)

Thanks for reading and please send me any helpful tips you guys have. I have joined a local marine club here which should help.
 

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When buying a tank, you really want to get one that is drilled. They usually refer to them as reef ready. While non-drilled is common for freshwater tanks, it doesn't make for a good saltwater tank ( it can be done just not ideal ). Once the tank is already setup, then deciding you want a drilled tank makes it more difficult to retrofit so just start out with a drilled tank. This way all your hardware doesn't have to hang off the back such as skimmers etc. Makes for a cleaner look, increases oxygen exchange just to name a few benefits.

Also, something else to consider, in freshwater rockwork is more sparse and is not really part of your filtration. In saltwater it is a vital component. So if given the choice you want a tank that is wide. Best to be at least 18" wide but 24" is even better. Typically bowfronts are narrow on the ends and makes it a real challenge and not really ideal. Secondly, it really limits the size of sump you can put below because of lack of room on the ends. While bowfronts may be a bit more flashy to some people, the most functional tanks are still just a normal retangle vs. bowfront.

If you got the money to do so, and aren't thinking you want to go much longer than 48", a 120g ( 24" wide ) is probably you best option, a 75 or 90g tank ( which is 18" wide ) is decent but not as ideal as a 120g. 120g will also have better resale as well if you ever upgrade or decide to reef tank is just not for you.....
 

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I have a 90 and wish i went 120 so i could have islands for things like zoas , star polyps and xenia .

I also have a odd shaped tank (surfline) which is really neet but hard to build a stand for and the only ones you can buy don't have room on the bottom for a sump.

I did find a hang on skimmer that works but it was $450 ... (building a sump , plumbing it and buying a normal skimmer will prolly be substantially more though)

so basically i agree with David : )

Id just wait around and buy a used set up, it's so much cheaper ...
 
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