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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got a new tank, and I found a guy who is selling his live rock and live sand from his tank. His tank has been running for 2 years straight. And he assures me that all the parameters (i.e. water quality, ph, salinity) are great. How long will I have to wait to introduce livestock to the tank. I'm going to use Natural Seawater to fill the tank.
 

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Eats Crayons
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Woahhhhhhhhhh! hold up a sec fella. You do not want to reuse sand especially a sand bed that old. An established sand bed is kind of like layers of toxins. As long as you dont disturb the layers the tanks stays happy but as soon as you do your in trouble. Seeing that your just starting your tank I would reuse the live rock after a solid " cooking session" and buy your own sand. Welcome to TRT hope this helps

Mike
 

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Tampa Reefer
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There are other schools of thought. I'd use the sand, but rinse it first. And I'd use the LR exactly as it is, no "cooking", because I like LIVE rock. If you cook it you then have to wait for the bacteria, coralline, coral, sponges, tunicates, and whatever else to move back in.
 

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Eats Crayons
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Indeed there is always more than one way to skin a cat. You just have to weigh the pros and cons and ultimately choose for yourself. Thats the nice thing is you always get more than one point of view at TRT!:wavey:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The tank im purchasing the stuff from only has about an inch thick layer of sand. It's not a DSB. Im going to use this sand to seed other sand, in my tank which will be a DSB. And there is no way in hell im "Cooking" the live rock, i've seen it, it gorgeous. I'm sure there will be a small ammonia spike, and a small amount of die-off, but I'm willing to risk that.
 

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I'm sure there will be a small ammonia spike, and a small amount of die-off, but I'm willing to risk that.
A so called small ammonia spike and die off is not the only thing at risk using someone else's rock and sand.

I, too, have reused sand, after a thorough rinsing.

If the rock is loaded with phospate, you are asking for a lot of work. Please, investigate before doing.

Either way you go, wait a couple months before adding more livestock. this is not a freshwater tank. breathe, slow down, breathe, slow down some more...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
After a thorough saltwater rinse? Would you still rinse it if you are only using about an inch worth to seed a DSB? Also do I have to use a packaged "Live Sand" or can I use Quickrete Premium White Sand?
 

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After a thorough saltwater rinse? Would you still rinse it if you are only using about an inch worth to seed a DSB? Also do I have to use a packaged "Live Sand" or can I use Quickrete Premium White Sand?
I would rinse the sand. I rinsed mine in tap water. Put the sand in a 5 gallon bucket and rinsed away. I rinsed and rinsed and rinsed again. Then I rinsed again for good measure. I have never used Quickrete except for posts.

And how would I know if the rock is loaded with phosphate? Just a simple test kit?
that I don't know. I just know there is potential for headache using other peoples rock, and sand for that matter. Medicmike or bnautic may have more info.

When i brought in live rock, I also brought in aiptasia. I did have to pick up some aiptasiaX and a couple peppermint shrimps.

Understand when you bring in someone else's live rock, you also potentially bring in there problems.
I don't know if ich cysts can transfer on live rock or not. there are many variables one must look at.
We haven't even discussed different types of algae that could be hiding in the rocks.

I haven't seen the rock or the tank. If it appears good, I recommend using the rock as is. On a side note, I would wait a couple months and see if there are issues that need to be resolved before placing livestock in the tank. There will be plenty for you to look at with just live rock for those two months. there will be critters coming from everywhere; fan worms, crabs, hermits, snails, and if you are not careful, maybe even a fish.

Maybe someone else will chime back in here.
 

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Carpe Noctem
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There are other schools of thought. I'd use the sand, but rinse it first. And I'd use the LR exactly as it is, no "cooking", because I like LIVE rock. If you cook it you then have to wait for the bacteria, coralline, coral, sponges, tunicates, and whatever else to move back in.
Actually bacteria, coraline, sponges and a few other things survive and somewhat proliferate during the cooking process. Better to get that po4 and no3 out which in turn helps much of the "live" things on the rock. And you turn the rock from an algae driven no3/po4 process to a bacterial driven po4/no3 process.

True some stuff dies off, but a tank with cooked rock has a much better chance at long-term success.
 

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Carpe Noctem
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And how would I know if the rock is loaded with phosphate? Just a simple test kit?
If it is in a running tank it has po4 locked up in it. The breaking point is usually when the rock becomes overloaded and begins being covered in algae. Could be months or years until it reaches this point depending upon the husbandry of the person keeping it. But at some point, all rock needs a little attention.
 
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