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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
this snail is the size of my fist,lol..i already forgot the name of it,:idea: ..its so cool how the outer for -skin covers the whole shell with all these cool looking tentacles..also bought 10 star snails and my first clam:banana:
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
:agree: :agree: :agree:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
66 views and no comments?,lol..i think the snail is cool as truck
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ill post some more pics when the forskin un covers the shell..its a very shinny shell when its un covered...it looks almost like am anemone snail,lol
 

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Cowrie!
 

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Most likely a tiger cowrie.

Does it look like this when the shell is exposed?

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
more pics

more pics..yep thats the name,lol.i paid $38 for it...this is a weird looking creature..its amazing to look at.mybe its a good glass cleaner:p ..excuse my hand, i punched my microwave front door,lol..im gonna do a google search and read about it:thumbup: ..theres so many cool things in the ocean!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i did a google search and it said at its adult stage it could eat anemones and some corals..yea whats adult stage though?..i heard these things get 3 feet..im sure they are a slow grower
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4 width=616 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=arbreadcr width="100%" height=3></SPAN></TD><TD class=arbreadcr vAlign=top noWrap align=right>DFS7 Monday June 18, 2007</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><SCRIPT language=javascript> <!-- function popupWin1(source, left, top, width, height, options) { var left = left + 40; var windowproperties = options + ",left=" + left + ",top=" + top + ",width=" + width + ",height=" + height popup = window.open(source,"Dictionary_term",windowproperties) } //--></SCRIPT><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=600 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width=10></TD><TD align=middle>Tiger Cowrie


Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith, Inc.
<CENTER></CENTER></TD><TD width=10></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=600 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width=10></TD><TD class=artext vAlign=top>Cypraea tigris

<TABLE borderColor=#006699 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=5 width=290 bgColor=#ffffcc border=1 frame=box><TBODY><TR><TH class=thra>Quick Stats: Tiger Cowrie</TH></TR><TR><TD class=arbreadcr>Family: Cypraeidae
Range: Indo-Pacific
Size: Up to 4 inches
Diet: Carnivore
Tank Set-up: Marine: Coral, live rock, sand
Reef Compatible: With caution
Tank Conditions: 72-78ºF; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4
Temperament: Peaceful
Venomous: No
Care Level: Easy

</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
The Tiger Cowrie has an egg-shaped, spotted, glossy shell and is in high demand for the rock aquarium. It differs in color depending upon geographical location. While it does not have an operculum to shut when it retracts its mantle into its shell, the opening is lined with "threatening" tooth-like structures. Normally, the mantle will completely cover its shell unless it feels threatened. This helps it keep its lustrous white and brown mottled coloration, while its mantle will appear like a fingerprint of black and gray, with many short papillae over the surface.
In the wild, it can be found under rocks or resting on soft corals during the day, foraging for food mostly at night. The Tiger Cowrie prefers a rock aquarium with hiding places. While small, it will eat some algae and scavenge for scraps, (((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((but as an adult, it will eat some anemones, sponges, and soft corals)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))0)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))), and is best housed with starfish, sea urchins, and tubeworms in the reef aquarium. Do not house it with Condylactis sp. It needs low nitrate levels and will not tolerate copper-based medications.
The diet of a large Tiger Cowrie should be supplemented with pieces of fish and mussel, and a product such as TetraTips.


</TD><TD></TD><TD vAlign=top width=50></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
this thing hardly moves,lol
 

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I had one years ago and they feed mostly at night. Keep an eye on the other snails in your tank. Before I realized what was happening my cowrie ate almost every single snail in my tank. I didn't really pay attention to the shells piling up around the tank until I observed it one night wrapping up an astrea in it's foot and devouring it. All that was left was a shiny cleaned out shell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I had one years ago and they feed mostly at night. Keep an eye on the other snails in your tank. Before I realized what was happening my cowrie ate almost every single snail in my tank. I didn't really pay attention to the shells piling up around the tank until I observed it one night wrapping up an astrea in it's foot and devouring it. All that was left was a shiny cleaned out shell.
did yours knock stuff over on the rocks? ive heard they knock stuff over..where did yours stay most of the time?..i attached him to the front glass when i put him in my tank..i held it to the glass and he started to stick right on..did you ever try to hand feed it?

thanks
 

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did yours knock stuff over on the rocks? ive heard they knock stuff over..where did yours stay most of the time?..i attached him to the front glass when i put him in my tank..i held it to the glass and he started to stick right on..did you ever try to hand feed it?

thanks
When I had mine it was in a fish only tank. This was years ago when crushed coral substrates and bleached white coral skeletons made up the majority of saltwater tanks. There really wasn't anything in the tank that it could knock over but I would guess that it will be like most large snails in reef tanks and bulldoze whatever happens to get in the way.

Knowing what I do now, I would say that mine ate all my snails due to lack of algae or any other food sources. Back then if a coral skeleton started to get algae growing on it, I simply pulled it out and soaked it in freshwater with a capful of bleach. A few days soaking followed by a quick rinse and back in the tank it went.

I never did try handfeeding mine but you could try a silverside or something similar. They can ingest suprisingly large food items and your snail looks much larger than mine was. I would say give it a shot and don't forget to take some pics.
 
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