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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hopefully this is the right thread to be asking....

Ok, this is the 2nd salt tank I have done, the first was over 10years ago....

the tank is a 45tall (25x18x25)
My thoughts are this for filtration and what not
-Fluval 205 (already have)
-Pentair Aquatics (Lifeguard #FB300) Fluidized bed filter (rio 600 powered)
-Protein skimmer (unknown brand right now...)
-ebo jager heater
-2 Hydor Koralia #1 wave circ. pumps hooked to a wave maker
-Lighting will be 2 bulbs at ho, and 2 bulbs at vho. Like to add some lunar lights. The only issue I have is that Id like to have a single unit. Ive found a 4 bulb hood, that is hooked up for 2 ho, and 2 for vho(just need a ballast for vho)

As for the protein skimmer.....I originally thought the seaclone 100 would be a good choice, but after reading alot of different reviews, I struggle to think that was a good choice. 2nd choice is a Aquarium Systems PS, its used and reminds me of a seaclone.....but I came from using a Lee's counter current PS, so...these new skimmers a trick to me :p
Ive seen some hang on the back ones called "Aqua-C Remora or Remora Pro" using a surface skimmer/bubble trap, and a Maxi-jet pump. Id like to find a hang on the back PS thats very reliable, and easy to use and set-up.

The lighting is also a big factor...as I plan to get a few soft corals(colt, mushroom, clam, and afew other easy to take care of ones to start with.) Id like to either make a case to hold a 4 or 6 bulb retro kit in VHO, as I have read 4-6 watts per gallon. Id like to see daylight bulbs, and attinics, or 50/50 in there as well. Im not sure if a MH bulb would cook the tank, as I dont want a chiller......
As you can see...I have aloy of questions....and hopefully some of you might be able to help. As for fish....
Im looking at a clown fish, hippo tang(dora from nemo :p ), prawls(or prawn) gobie, and a scooter blennie. Down the line Id like to go with a much bigger tank...possibly a 90ish that will be housing a dwarf octopus.

Any ideas and help you can throw my way would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
S
 

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Welcome to TRT :wavey:

First I think you may want to get a good book on marine reef keeping.

A Hippo Tang needs at least a 75-90 gallon tank.
Clowns, small Gobies and Blennies are probably OK for a 45 gallon.:cool:

For filtration, live rock and skimmer with a sump are best for reef tanks. Mechanical filters build up too much nitrate.

You can use a HOB skimmer without a sump. The Ramora by Aqua C is used by many people on this site. I used a WON Brothers 125 HOB venturi skimmer that worked well but the pump needed is @ 600 GPH and would take up too much room in a 45 Gal.

As for flow in tank the Hydors are a good choice. If you decide to get SPS corals you would need higher flow rates than the Hydor 1's provide.

For lighting T5 or MH lighting seem to be the lighting of choice for most people.

If you check out the Reef keeping Equipment Section archives of this site you can get a good start.

HTH

Doug
 

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Welcome to TRT!!!

:wavey:

great start by asking before jumping back in. a lot has changed in 10 years. most of the tanks now are run with only LR for biological filtration and a skimmer for mechanical filtration. no other filters are necessary. there are other stuff that can be used to help, but not a must. UV filters are prolly the most common.

keeping clams and not having a chiller are very difficult. the amount of light needed for clams and other corals really heats up a tank.

the biggest thing to do is take it really slow. the longer it takes for you to set it up the less "problems" you will have. tanks do not really mature till they are about 1 year old. up until that point you are always fighting something. :(

G~
 

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The aqua C is a good skimmer. Mine pulls some very nasty dark stuff lately. I went from a light tea color to a dark green over the past few weeks. I'm trying to skim wet, but its not doing it like it used to. In the past, wet skimming would get me a cup a day of a light green tea color. Now I get a cup a week (but much darker green...like a tree leaf) on the same setting/height

Other factor is noise. I find it very loud and in the past month it has been making some weird vibrating noise. Not sure where its coming from on the skimmer. I think it might be the maxi-jet 1200 doing something funky. I clean it once a month, so not sure what is going on.

Sometimes I wish I bought the coral-life super skimmer instead of this. I have been reading good stuff about that one too.
 

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Hippo tangs are not Dora from nemo, I think you mean the regal blue tang. Tangs generally need a large tank to live long term. Like Geoff said, the fluidized bed filter and canister filters are not needed. Save the money and get a good quality skimmer. The remora that you mentioned is a good choice for the size tank you have. The Koralia is an excellent power head for water movement, but I'm not sure if it's compatible with a wavemaker. VHO lights will work fine for the corals you listed but the clam needs intense lighting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
would a MH bulb sitting on top of the aquarium raise the temp enough to cook stuff? Ive seen 150watt bulbs as the lowest so far.....The tang is open to discussion to say, since Ive got to have the blennie, gobie, and the clown. other tank inhabitants(sp?) will be brittle stars, serpent stars, a long spined sea urchin, hermit crabs and some snail of different types.

I would like to know more on the fluidized bed filter, why most of you that posted and saying its un-nessicary? As for the skimmer, its really between the Aqua-C and a CPR Bak-Pak 2.
One thing is the Hydor Koralia #1 pumps put out like 200+gph and that isnt enough? I mean I work for Pentair water and knowing that this kind of flow isnt small, since I have done alot with actual water pumps I just cant see a powerhead with that kind of flow in that kind of small place :p But if a pair of #2's will fit better.....tis all good.
But Id like to make sure this tank is done right from the planning stages.

thanks,
S
 

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Welcome to TRT!As people said the tank is to small for Tangs.I had a Remora Aqua C Pro and bought a Coralife,and like that so much more!An Octapus isn't a good Ideal,They don't live long and you'll have to lock a lid on,because they go out of the tank looking for food.
 

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HI and Welcome. Like Geoff said your def off to the right start asking before jumping.
If you want corals you really dont need the fluval the live rock will be your filter. You may also want to look into a sump if you have the room. This a place for all you equipment to go heaters skimmer you can also throw some live rock in there so your pods will have a home. Check with our sponsor salty supply he gave me a really good deal on my skimmer aquac 180 and I love it. If you want to go with a hang on skimmer also check out the coralife.
Good luck and welcome to the trt family!!
 

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would a MH bulb sitting on top of the aquarium raise the temp enough to cook stuff? Ive seen 150watt bulbs as the lowest so far
Yes it would raise the temp some, how much depends on the distance to the water surface and the amount of air flow around the bulb and the hood. For example, a pendant will not raise the temp as much as a bulb in a closed hood. There are 75 watt halides available, but I wouldn't recommend them.

I would like to know more on the fluidized bed filter, why most of you that posted and saying its un-nessicary?
Fluidized bed filters give you an incredible amount of surface area for dentrifying bacteria. But in a reef tank, if you use live rock, the porous rocks will do the same. A simple sand bed will also perform the same function. Basically, a fluidized be filter is a waste of money as far as reef tanks are concerned. Their real value would be in somthing like a fish only tank with some plastic plants in it and nothing more for biological filtration.

As for the skimmer, its really between the Aqua-C and a CPR Bak-Pak 2.
go for the aqua c

One thing is the Hydor Koralia #1 pumps put out like 200+gph and that isnt enough? I mean I work for Pentair water and knowing that this kind of flow isnt small, since I have done alot with actual water pumps I just cant see a powerhead with that kind of flow in that kind of small place :p But if a pair of #2's will fit better.....tis all good.
You have to think about flow in relation to the size of the water stream. If you compare 200 gph of flow coming out as a stream 0.5 inch in diameter versus 200 gph in a stream that is 5 inches in diameter, there is a huge difference. The Koralia creates a very wide flow pattern, so even though it's 200 gph, it's still a very gentle flow and won't create a hurricane inside your tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thanks for the replies thus far.....feel free to keep them coming!!!

The fluval was going to be used for chemicals....ie(carbon, those noodle things they send with the kit, and whatever else will help.)
As for a sump? I never gave it any thought. I did at one time want a wet/dry filter...Im hoping this is the same type of sump your refering to?

As for lights...Ive read, that 6watts is good lighting for each gallon of the aquarium. And with HO I havent seen a high enough wattage in hoods to attain that in a 2-4 bulb fixture. That was the only reason for going to vho. Even the power compats just dont put out that much wattage. Unless Im not seeing something in plain sight, how would this work out? the tank dimensions are 25longx18deepx25high. The tang is a open item, I like the look of them but its not needed :p

Deffiently going to have a few soft corals the choices I have looked at were:
Yellow Fiji Finger Leather, Flourescent Green Rasta Leather, Neon Green tree coral(leather), Colt Coral, Yellow tree Gorgonian, Red Sea Pink/white pumping Xenia, short tentacle plate coral.

As for all the fish I looked at:
Randall's Gobie, Golden head sleeper gobie, watchman bluespotted goby, scooter blennie, 8 line wrasse, starry lawnmower blenny.
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Later on, Id like to get that blue hippo tang(dora-finding nemo?) and a Black tang. This of course will be in a 90 gallon I might do in a few years.....right after I get a house bought or built.
 

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Fluidized bed filters give you an incredible amount of surface area for dentrifying bacteria. But in a reef tank, if you use live rock, the porous rocks will do the same. A simple sand bed will also perform the same function. Basically, a fluidized be filter is a waste of money as far as reef tanks are concerned. Their real value would be in somthing like a fish only tank with some plastic plants in it and nothing more for biological filtration.
While I agree in principle, I just wanted to point out how much more efficient fluidized bed filters are compared to live rock in terms of their biological filtration capability. I would NEVER start up any tank (except for a QT) without live rock, and I am a huge fan of its biological filtration capacity, not to mention its benefit in terms of habitat and aesthetics. Having said that, IMO adding a FBF to a reef tank with less than 1.5 lbs of live rock per gallon can provide excellent biological filtration at a considerable cost savings given the price of live rock.

Anyways...just a thought. Here's an article for more reading:

http://petcare.suite101.com/article.cfm/fluidized_bed_filters

Good Luck!
 

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While I agree in principle, I just wanted to point out how much more efficient fluidized bed filters are compared to live rock in terms of their biological filtration capability. I would NEVER start up any tank (except for a QT) without live rock, and I am a huge fan of its biological filtration capacity, not to mention its benefit in terms of habitat and aesthetics. Having said that, IMO adding a FBF to a reef tank with less than 1.5 lbs of live rock per gallon can provide excellent biological filtration at a considerable cost savings given the price of live rock.

Anyways...just a thought. Here's an article for more reading:

http://petcare.suite101.com/article.cfm/fluidized_bed_filters

Good Luck!
While the FBF will provide more surface area for bacteria, it will do an even better job at collecting detritus. This is exactly what I would want to avoid. The bacteria on the rock will provide the necessary filtration and if you have an adequate skimmer and flow, its all you need. The fluidized filter is more cost and added effort that IMO is not needed or beneficial when you compare the pros and cons. Using lbs per gallon when it comes to live rock is such an inaccurate method for figuring out the amount. Porosity, flow and skimmer are more important to consider as they will dictate the effectiveness of nutrient processing and removal.
Of course this is just my .02
 

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While the FBF will provide more surface area for bacteria, it will do an even better job at collecting detritus. This is exactly what I would want to avoid. The bacteria on the rock will provide the necessary filtration and if you have an adequate skimmer and flow, its all you need. The fluidized filter is more cost and added effort that IMO is not needed or beneficial when you compare the pros and cons. Using lbs per gallon when it comes to live rock is such an inaccurate method for figuring out the amount. Porosity, flow and skimmer are more important to consider as they will dictate the effectiveness of nutrient processing and removal.
Of course this is just my .02
I agree on the inaccuracy of calculating live rock on a pounds per gallon system. The 1.5 lbs is assuming premium, porous live rock. I recently conducted a test with FBFs, and I was really surprised at their effectiveness as an adjunct to live rock for biological filtartion in a reef system. I did not have the same experience with detritus--in fact, one of the things I like best about FBF is that they are essentially self-cleaning. Of course a FBF can be a time bomb if the power goes out, but we also face multiple issues with our systems in the event of a power outage. I don't mean to position FBF as a silver bullet of any kind, but a good FBF used properly is, in my experience, indeed a highly efficient biological filtration mechanism. While it may not be needed, I strongly disagree that a FBF is not beneficial. Maybe I'll go dig up my data from the experiment if I have time later this afternoon and post it here. The bottom line is that it's so good that people take the time to put all the options on the table and discuss them BEFORE setting up their own system. I love this website for that reason! Cheers!
 

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How is an FBF self cleaning? Water is pumped, detritus captured in the media and processed to SOME extent. The only way to truly remove nutrients is with a skimmer, siphoning etc. Im not sure how detritus isnt an issue with an FBF. Over time it would become saturated (just like a sand bed) and then be replaced. Ive never used em. Never will for that reason. I tank with good flow and a good skimmer can run perfectly clean water with less than 1 lb of rock per gallon. Its all in the design.
Of course this is all based on my experience so everyone will differ.
I do think that when starting out its best to keep things as simple as possible. Make cleaning a breeze and make a tank that keeps itself clean. This will cut down on expense, frustration and confusion, allowing for a good grasp of th basics. Flow, skimmer, rock..the keys to a great tank!
 

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How is an FBF self cleaning? Water is pumped, detritus captured in the media and processed to SOME extent. The only way to truly remove nutrients is with a skimmer, siphoning etc. Im not sure how detritus isnt an issue with an FBF. Over time it would become saturated (just like a sand bed) and then be replaced. Ive never used em. Never will for that reason. I tank with good flow and a good skimmer can run perfectly clean water with less than 1 lb of rock per gallon. Its all in the design.
Of course this is all based on my experience so everyone will differ.
I do think that when starting out its best to keep things as simple as possible. Make cleaning a breeze and make a tank that keeps itself clean. This will cut down on expense, frustration and confusion, allowing for a good grasp of th basics. Flow, skimmer, rock..the keys to a great tank!
I agree that the basics are indeed live rock, protein skimming and copious (albeit well designed) current. There is no disagreement there. I also agree in keeping it simple. As you know, a FBF is a choice that some aquarist employ in addition to those mechanisms, and if used properly, a FBF is a highly efficient biological filtration device that can handle high bioloads, especially if the aquarist is unable to afford sufficient quantities of premium live rock.

Regarding a FBF being self-cleaning, the media is constantly fluidized and is in constant contact with itself causing detritus to be knocked off and bacteria to be able to colonize all the surfaces of each granuel (sp?). Yes, you can change the media if you are concerned about the FBF becoming a detritus trap over time, but this is as simple as cleaning the skimmate out of your skimmer.

I'm not trying to champion the FBF, I'm simply saying that it should not be catagorically dismissed as being harmful to one's system. As I said earlier, I was impressed with the data I accumulated as a result of my recent FBF experiment. Should everyone run out and buy one? (Yes for their QT!) Of course not, but it's worth considering as part of a comprehensive marine system.
 

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I agree that the basics are indeed live rock, protein skimming and copious (albeit well designed) current. There is no disagreement there. I also agree in keeping it simple. As you know, a FBF is a choice that some aquarist employ in addition to those mechanisms, and if used properly, a FBF is a highly efficient biological filtration device that can handle high bioloads, especially if the aquarist is unable to afford sufficient quantities of premium live rock.

Regarding a FBF being self-cleaning, the media is constantly fluidized and is in constant contact with itself causing detritus to be knocked off and bacteria to be able to colonize all the surfaces of each granuel (sp?). Yes, you can change the media if you are concerned about the FBF becoming a detritus trap over time, but this is as simple as cleaning the skimmate out of your skimmer.

I'm not trying to champion the FBF, I'm simply saying that it should not be catagorically dismissed as being harmful to one's system. As I said earlier, I was impressed with the data I accumulated as a result of my recent FBF experiment. Should everyone run out and buy one? (Yes for their QT!) Of course not, but it's worth considering as part of a comprehensive marine system.
:D
 
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