The Reef Tank banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
27,696 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wrote a letter to Spartanburg Water Works to find out about phosphates in our water. Here's the answer I got. Tell me what you think, and while you're at it, what's the water like in your areas?

"According to our Water Quality Mananger, typical phosphate levels in finished water run in the
.8 - 1.2 ppm range. The bulk of it is added as part of our corrosion control program, a small amount is natural in the source water. The regulatory driver for this addition is the Lead and Copper Rule. DHEC requires that we maintain a minimum of .6ppm total phosphate throughout the distribution system. To accomplish this, we have to start at a slightly higher level going out of the plant. The phosphate acts to form a thin coating on the inside of pipes and fixtures that resists corrosion, and also acts a "sequestering agent" to capture certain metals (like lead and copper) that may become dissolved as the result of corrosion.
If you'd like additional information about filtration and/or water quality, our Water Quality Report can be captured as a .pdf file from our website at www.sws-sssd.org."
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
27,696 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:rolleyes: heheheh ah well, you bumped up the thread and that's a help in itself :)
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
47,668 Posts
That sounds like fairly typical mini water management. Remember that drinking water standards are way looser than water quality required to successfully raise and keep most inverts.
Even excellelent muni water supplies fall way short of the requirments for reef safe water, and the additives used can fluctuate in variety and intensity over time, depending on the water systems goals. Pour in Tap Water Conditioners and anti chlor barely scratch the surface of reef safe issues, as always I got 2 words: RO/DI
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top