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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hopefully this will make at least a little sense but I want to build a monti shelf for center of my tank using different color plates.

Can this be achieved outside of the tank and if so how long is to long for the coral plates to be outside of water?

Are there certain plate colors that do not or will not get along?

Has anybody done this and if so can you share a pic and advise?

Thanks!
 

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If you are asking how long the coral can be out of the water to glue them into place the answer is about 2-4 hours depending on the coral. I would only keep them out of water for about 20 minutes. I hate leaving corals out of water even though most SOS that live in tidal pools thrive being out of water in the middle of a HOT equator day for hours on end. They develop a slime on them that protects the corals like a sunscreen/slime coat. It defends against the elements for a while as long as the corals are healthy.
 

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Agree w/ 90ReefZilla - Monti caps produce a lot of mucus out of the water.

And I wouldn't push it beyond 30 minutes at the most. If they are drying out then get them in the water ASAP or spray them down with tank water.

Each time I do a water change I have several monti caps (and other sps) out of the water ~30 minutes. They do fine. Less time is better for the corals.

I'd make sure you are all prepped with everything you need on hand prior to pulling the corals out of the water and glueing them. You will want to minimize the amount of time they are out of the water.

Here is time series pic of my monti cap wall. The caps at the top, from the bottom of the Tunze pump up, are all out of the water during water changes. They manage it just fine, but produce a lot of mucus. I run carbon in the tank just in case there are any chemicals in this mucus that may irritate my other sps.



As for your question of monti caps getting along?

They will grow in and around each other. What you will find is they start to shade each other from the light, that area that is shaded dies and turns white. This is not bleaching or tissue disease of any sort. It is what happens to large coral heads that are shaded. A healthy coral will survive with the lower part, that is shaded, is dead.

You can easily trim them to get them to grow in shapes that you like; they easily break off with your fingers or a cutting tool. You are essentially a gardener.

This is the list of monti caps that I have on the wall that you see:
Grape Capicornis (pink/purple)
Orangade Capricornis (orange/red)
Purple Smoke Capricornis (deep purple)
Shady Lady Capricornis (olive green)

The pics aren't that great is showing the colors, unfortunately. It is really a very nice color palette.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Agree w/ 90ReefZilla - Monti caps produce a lot of mucus out of the water.

And I wouldn't push it beyond 30 minutes at the most. If they are drying out then get them in the water ASAP or spray them down with tank water.

Each time I do a water change I have several monti caps (and other sps) out of the water ~30 minutes. They do fine. Less time is better for the corals.

I'd make sure you are all prepped with everything you need on hand prior to pulling the corals out of the water and glueing them. You will want to minimize the amount of time they are out of the water.

Here is time series pic of my monti cap wall. The caps at the top, from the bottom of the Tunze pump up, are all out of the water during water changes. They manage it just fine, but produce a lot of mucus. I run carbon in the tank just in case there are any chemicals in this mucus that may irritate my other sps.



As for your question of monti caps getting along?

They will grow in and around each other. What you will find is they start to shade each other from the light, that area that is shaded dies and turns white. This is not bleaching or tissue disease of any sort. It is what happens to large coral heads that are shaded. A healthy coral will survive with the lower part, that is shaded, is dead.

You can easily trim them to get them to grow in shapes that you like; they easily break off with your fingers or a cutting tool. You are essentially a gardener.

This is the list of monti caps that I have on the wall that you see:
Grape Capicornis (pink/purple)
Orangade Capricornis (orange/red)
Purple Smoke Capricornis (deep purple)
Shady Lady Capricornis (olive green)

The pics aren't that great is showing the colors, unfortunately. It is really a very nice color palette.
A ton of great info thank you. Did you create those walls?
 

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A ton of great info thank you. Did you create those walls?
Yes, I created the wall of monti caps from a few frags placed on a long skinny rock. As the caps grew out, I broke pieces of them off and glued them in the gaps. Eventually the whole thing filled in.

The monti cap wall is on left side of the tank from the bottom of the tank to the top. There are corals in the foreground blocking the monti caps towards the sand bed.

 
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