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Summer and Alyssa's Daddy
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I am guessing take a magnesium test, as well as a copper test for starters. Not sure how to test for everything else, metal wise anyways.

Ray
 

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THe test available for hobby are limited both in accuracy and availability. One could spend money(cubic) sending it out to a decent lab , unless one has connections at university or industrial lab. But that would only address contaminants in the water column. You are apt to have them absorbed in to porous rock or substrates, I don't know what the test protocols for that entail but I am guessing its not cheap
 

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I think it would be safe to assume that we do put large ammounts of metals into our tank.
If you use any of these ASW mixes then you can count on this
ASW study
If you use a calcium reactor with any of these media Media study
Or if you feed you tank with any of these food study
I think it would seem logical that if one puts this stuff in or uses and of these then you will have what they are made up of in you tank.

MIke
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
True

If you ask a chemist they'll say it's bound by carbonates. But then biologists/ecologists will tell you it's working it's way up in the food chain.

So, if it's bound by carbonates but yet it's incorporated into the food chain - what's the process that makes that possible? and at what stage would it easily be eliminated from the system?
 

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I'm guessing it is part of the glue that manufactures process these foods. Take for instance a food pellet, how in the heck it stays good for so long without spoiling and that matter how does it shape into a pellet? Flake food, can you imaging what it takes to make a flake and hold together? What about that mush you make? I made a food mush this weekend, at the store they have what you call a gumbo mix (just for us Louisianans) if was a mixture of clams,shrimp oysters and a few others. I'm imaging these creatures have metals in them, just imagine what they eat, and how polluted is our waters from which they live and eat in?
 

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ROOTS...ROCKS...REGGAE
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Do we even know if metals are harmfull in a reef system? Other then copper of coarse, what other metals are dangerous? BTW I know from experience the wildly popular Southdown sand is loaded with iron particles. Run a big magnet through a bag of it and see for yourself.
 

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Spanky said:

So, if it's bound by carbonates but yet it's incorporated into the food chain - what's the process that makes that possible? and at what stage would it easily be eliminated from the system?
Bacteria in the substrate processing the detritus. Vaccumm the sybstrate or remove the detritus someother way.
 

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I still like the sand filter idea, if I could make a mechanical system, that cleans it top to bottom, but on a slow, slow process, to avoid releasing more toxins than the tank can handle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Does anyone remember when UGF's were all the rage. All these gravel companies (that are now sand companies) were pushing the benefits of their different gravels. What was the big selling point? How long they would provide buffering for the tank, alk, and help adjust Ph.

This gravel was a combination of crushed limestone or aragonite, all being CaCo3 calcium carbonate. We're still using those materials in sand and rocks.

So what process would stop them from adjusting Ph?
 

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I remeber reading about UGF's, it was the biggest part of your system, but there was only one thing they didn't tell you........Eventually the trap would get clogged!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yeah but Scott that was forced filtration.

The little pieces of calcium carbonate (gravel/sand) would get a bio-film combination of bacteria and what bacteria can produce that would seal off the grains of gravel. That bio-film would seal the gravel grains, nothing out, nothing in.

Sand and rocks in your tank are the same CaCo3 and get sealed by that same bio-film.
 

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Spanky said:
So what process would stop them from adjusting Ph?
Well they don't begin to break down unless they are in an acidic environement. The alkalinity (buffering) would prohibit this.
Steve
 
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