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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my mag test came out to 1050 at a salinity of 1.023..is that about right?..its my first mag test i ever did.just got it in the mail.its by red sea..what a pain in the butt.it came with 3 bottles and 2 syringes
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
says on box your soposta campare those readings to your salinity level..anyone else have an answer? and what to do if its to high or to low?

thanks :)
 

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MY CAL STAYS AT 500. I HEARD THAT WAS GOOD THOUGH:read: .IM NOT SURE WHAT MY ALK IS.MY PH STAYS STEADY AT 8.2 .I USE TROPIC MORAN AND DO A 20% WATER CHANGE EVERY WEAK.I DONT USE ANY ADDITIVES

?????????????????????//
 

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spaceman spiff
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Understanding alkalinity levels is pretty integral in understanding the calcium and magnesium story of your tank. Calc at 500 is kind of high in my experience, as it can lead to lower concentrations of alkalinity (they somewhat compete for space in the water). I'd recommend testing for alk if you could.

Also, using a test for pH can be pretty misleading, which is why I think you feel your pH is consistent at 8.2. Depending on the time of day, pH will swing about 0.2-0.4 per day. Test kits are not always very accurate. A lot of folks will rely on a probe and monitor for pH.

Anyways, I'm sure I'm not telling you what you want to hear (and probably confusing you even more!), but if mag is too low you can add magnesium suppliments to the tank. However, this is not very necessary unless you have a lot of stony corals. Maybe we should start by asking why you are interested in understanding and testing for magnesium?
 

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MY CAL STAYS AT 500. I HEARD THAT WAS GOOD THOUGH:read: .IM NOT SURE WHAT MY ALK IS.MY PH STAYS STEADY AT 8.2 .I USE TROPIC MORAN AND DO A 20% WATER CHANGE EVERY WEAK.I DONT USE ANY ADDITIVES

?????????????????????//
Hopefully, we can learn together!

BTW, I just wanted to let you know that it's poor internet ettiquette to type in all caps. It's the equivalent of shouting and it's also pretty hard to read.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Understanding alkalinity levels is pretty integral in understanding the calcium and magnesium story of your tank. Calc at 500 is kind of high in my experience, as it can lead to lower concentrations of alkalinity (they somewhat compete for space in the water). I'd recommend testing for alk if you could.

Also, using a test for pH can be pretty misleading, which is why I think you feel your pH is consistent at 8.2. Depending on the time of day, pH will swing about 0.2-0.4 per day. Test kits are not always very accurate. A lot of folks will rely on a probe and monitor for pH.

Anyways, I'm sure I'm not telling you what you want to hear (and probably confusing you even more!), but if mag is too low you can add magnesium suppliments to the tank. However, this is not very necessary unless you have a lot of stony corals. Maybe we should start by asking why you are interested in understanding and testing for magnesium?
i was just curious what the readings were.thats why i bought a mag test..just wanting the best water levels for my corals and inverts. i have a few kinds of leather corals, bubble coral,rit anemone,greenbubble tip anemone..5 different kinds of shrooms,zoos,brain,plate coral,pulsating zanias
 

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spaceman spiff
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just wanting the best water levels for my corals and inverts
A wise aquarist!

The corals you list don't have high demands for alkalinity or calcium (and therefore magnesium). I'd say you're mag level is fine, and don't worry about it again unless you're having problems or you start keeping some stony corals.
 

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Carpe Noctem
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Every reefer should own pH, Alk, mg and Ca tests... Should know how to use them and understand, even if in it's simplest terms, how all four are innerconnected:) It will save you some MASSIVE headaches down the road:D
 

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:D


If you can afford it, buy a pH meter, preferaby a PinPoint pH meter, rather than buy the chemical test kitsfor pH. The meter gives you much better data, and can be tested to assure accurate results (Borax test). I'd also recommend the Salifert Mg kit over the other kits on the market, much more specific and reliable results (and easier to use).

Magnesium levels in seawater should be around 1300 PPM when your salinity is 35 PPT. Since Mg is one of the consevative elements of seawater (i.e., that its proportion of the salinity mix should not change with varying levels of salinity), we can detemine what your Mg++ levels should be based on having seawater that demonstrates conservative proportionality.

Starting with S=35 and Mg = 1300 PP:
  • if S=35.0 PPT, then Mg = 1300 PPM
  • if S=34.5 PPT, then Mg = 1281 PPM
  • if S=34.0 PPT, then Mg = 1263 PPM
  • if S=33.5 PPT, then Mg = 1244 PPM
  • if S=33.0 PPT, then Mg = 1225 PPM
  • if S=32.5 PPT, then Mg = 1207 PPM
  • if S=32.0 PPT, then Mg = 1188 PPM
  • if S=31.5 PPT, then Mg = 1170 PPM
There is a mechanisms by which we can see Mg become disroportioinate in terms of the conservative elements, and it is totally unrelated to the biochemistry of coral systems or to biological sequestering of Magnesium. It involves the use of 2 part calcium and alkalinity additives used over time by aquarists. Calcium additives are usually calcium chloride, and alkalinity supplements are almost always sodium bicarbonate. If the corals use the calcium and the bicarbonate to make CaCO3 aragonite skeletons and release a proton, then that leaves... ...SODIUM CHLORIDE to accumulate in the tank. This gradually turns the salinity of the tank (as we remove seawater and add plain water to drop the salinity to correct for the accumulating NaCl left after supplementing the 2 part additives) into increasing percentages of sodium and chloride to form a brine of 35 PPT rather than seawater composed of our expected balance of conservatively proportionate elements. This is the most common reason we see declining Mg levels in closed system tanks, and THIS (declining Mg concentratin) accounts for declining supersaturations of calcium in seawater with respect to inorganic carbon (carbonate/bicarbonate) as we lose our Mg ion's ability to "poison" the seed crystal of precipitating CaCO3 (at what would otherwise be the edge of a "snow" event in the system) and to share the ionic load of keeping calcium and carbonate in solution with the other ions.

Complicated kinetics relating to the supersaturation of these ions in our oceanic soup of elements.


HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
:D


If you can afford it, buy a pH meter, preferaby a PinPoint pH meter, rather than buy the chemical test kitsfor pH. The meter gives you much better data, and can be tested to assure accurate results (Borax test). I'd also recommend the Salifert Mg kit over the other kits on the market, much more specific and reliable results (and easier to use).

Magnesium levels in seawater should be around 1300 PPM when your salinity is 35 PPT. Since Mg is one of the consevative elements of seawater (i.e., that its proportion of the salinity mix should not change with varying levels of salinity), we can detemine what your Mg++ levels should be based on having seawater that demonstrates conservative proportionality.

Starting with S=35 and Mg = 1300 PP:
  • if S=35.0 PPT, then Mg = 1300 PPM
  • if S=34.5 PPT, then Mg = 1281 PPM
  • if S=34.0 PPT, then Mg = 1263 PPM
  • if S=33.5 PPT, then Mg = 1244 PPM
  • if S=33.0 PPT, then Mg = 1225 PPM
  • if S=32.5 PPT, then Mg = 1207 PPM
  • if S=32.0 PPT, then Mg = 1188 PPM
  • if S=31.5 PPT, then Mg = 1170 PPM
There is a mechanisms by which we can see Mg become disroportioinate in terms of the conservative elements, and it is totally unrelated to the biochemistry of coral systems or to biological sequestering of Magnesium. It involves the use of 2 part calcium and alkalinity additives used over time by aquarists. Calcium additives are usually calcium chloride, and alkalinity supplements are almost always sodium bicarbonate. If the corals use the calcium and the bicarbonate to make CaCO3 aragonite skeletons and release a proton, then that leaves... ...SODIUM CHLORIDE to accumulate in the tank. This gradually turns the salinity of the tank (as we remove seawater and add plain water to drop the salinity to correct for the accumulating NaCl left after supplementing the 2 part additives) into increasing percentages of sodium and chloride to form a brine of 35 PPT rather than seawater composed of our expected balance of conservatively proportionate elements. This is the most common reason we see declining Mg levels in closed system tanks, and THIS (declining Mg concentratin) accounts for declining supersaturations of calcium in seawater with respect to inorganic carbon (carbonate/bicarbonate) as we lose our Mg ion's ability to "poison" the seed crystal of precipitating CaCO3 (at what would otherwise be the edge of a "snow" event in the system) and to share the ionic load of keeping calcium and carbonate in solution with the other ions.

Complicated kinetics relating to the supersaturation of these ions in our oceanic soup of elements.


HTH
looks like my mag is ok then by the chart 1050 at 1.023salinity
 
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