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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I did do a search, and didn't find a whole lot of information out there about these...

Does anyone effectively use Flourex fixtures? Are they really as bright as they say they are?

I know they only run at 6500K, but there is a fella on ebay that sells a filter that will bring it up to 10,000K. Has anyone tried that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Of course not...

I couldn't find it on HD's website, and I can't get to ebay from work.

It's a fairly large PC type bulb. It says it's equivalent to a 500W incandescent bulb, but only uses 65W. Seems to be pretty darn bright.

I went ahead and bought one at lunch today, but haven't even taken it out of the box yet. The color temp is a little warm for my preference, but with the 10,000K filter it's getting closer. I'd like to be more around 14000K.
 

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those lights are great for hanging over grow out tanks where you are looking for growth and not necessarily pretty to look at.

i would not put a filter on that. it will totally negate what the light is doing. it will filter out the yellow which is the spectrum of light critters need for photosynthesis. it will also block out a fair amount of the light output of the light also.

those lights also quickly get covered up with salt creep, so keep an eye on them. L.O.A also makes a 100w version for $60.

G~
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Will photosynthesis not take place at 10,000k? If that's the case, how does it work with MH bulbs that are 10,000+ K?
 

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the reason MH bulbs are used and not various other bulb types is that the gas composition can be changed to adjust the spectrum. it is still a mix of various gasses. each gas produces a spectrum, i do not know which gas produces which spectrum though. it looks 10K overal to us, but it still has a significant amount of light throughout the entire light spectrum.

flourescent tubes can also be adjusted the same way.

when you use a filter on a bulb you block out all of the rest of the light spectrum except for the colour you see.

as you go higher up in K on a bulb the less energy produced for photosynthesis. lucky for us the corals can find other methods to feed besides photosynthesis. this is why algae can not grow while corals can with these higher K bulbs. pretty much regardless of the nutrient levels. you can get away with some pretty high nutrient levels in a system if you use higher K bulbs. the drawback is you can really hinder the growth rates of these corals.

G~
 
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