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Im curious what anyone has to say about k values or the on metal halides. I have a coralife 150 watt with dual compacts and leds. Im wondering what anyone recommends or uses themselves. I might like a blue-er bulb if its not going to affect anything. only a frogspawn and some polyps right now, im going to get into LPS and other hard corals soon.


Thanks
 

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The "K" value is the Kelvin Tempersture of the bulb.
The higher the Kelvin the more blue the spectrum.
As far as actual output of the bulb the lower the Kelvin the higher the PAR (photosynthetic active radiation).

It's really personal preference on the color and for *most tank anything from 10K to 20K will be fine. 10K being a crips white (sometimes a lil yellow If your looking depending on teh bulb) and the 20K will be a dark blue (sometimes purple) For fast growth the lower Kelvin bulbs is that you want. I have tried bulb after bulb and have found that personally I like the 12K-14K.

you need to also consider the tank depth and it's inhabitants. You can provide too much light for some soft and LPS corals and cause them to bleach.
 

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just a guy with a reef...
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If your 150W lamps are Double Ended (DE), I can speak from experience that the Phoenix 14K 150W lamps are solid. I used them on my 30 gallon tank for a little over 2 years and had excellent growth on my LPS, SPS, and softies/Zoas.

I used them on Electronic Ballasts, which produced a nice crisp white(ish) blue look.
 

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If your 150W lamps are Double Ended (DE), I can speak from experience that the Phoenix 14K 150W lamps are solid. I used them on my 30 gallon tank for a little over 2 years and had excellent growth on my LPS, SPS, and softies/Zoas.

I used them on Electronic Ballasts, which produced a nice crisp white(ish) blue look.
+1... Although, if I were a SE bulb guy, I would be running Radiums :)
 

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Perfeshunal Hikk
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Kelvin is a temperature scale where 0 degrees Kelvin is what is known as Absolute Zero and is approximately -273.15 degrees Celsius.

The K value of the bulb has nothing to do with how hot or cold the bulb burns. It is a system that represents what temperature you would have to burn hydrogen at to produce the color that the bulb produces. (I think its hydrogen, may be helium, don't remember for sure but I believe its hydrogen). I don't think a bulb at 10,000 degrees Celsius would last very long in a canopy, or a house for that matter :)

There are exceptions. They make a 50K 150W Bulb that is not near as blue as you would expect it to be.

To me, the wavelength is a truer indication of what color you may be getting and Actinics are typically either 420 or 460nm wavelength bulbs. I think the "K scale" is on its way out though with LED's and other better ways to describe color spectrum.
 
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