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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you keep your Anemone alive? Everything in my tank is healthy but evertime I buy a bubble Tip Anemone it only last a week and then dies. Is there something I dont know that helps keep them alive? At my LFS they told me to feed it chop up silver sides or salad shrimp from the store. But when I do it will taken it in then 30 minuts later spit it back out making a mess in the tank.

So what do you guys do? and How long have you had your Anemone's for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
temp in tank is at 80 and Sp-G at 1.022 and ph at 8.3
2 Coralife compact fluorescent light bulbs
lunar blue LED lights, one is a 36W 10K Daylight, and Actinic Bulb.

Tanks 3 and half years old
 

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Copied from a survey conducted by Joyce Wilkerson (renowned clownfish breeder) quite a few years ago. I would imagine that the numbers have changed somewhat given the advances in reefkeeping but IMO too many anemones die needlessly in our tanks. With a natural potential lifespan of a hundred years or so, our success at keeping them in captivity is dismal. Anemones are among the most difficult animals to keep longterm. You should be well in the advanced stages of this hobby before attempting to keep anemones.

The survey from volunteers showed that

45% of anemones kept by hobbyists with less than 2 years of marine aquarium keeping experience were dead after an average of 3 months.
Those hobbyists with 2-5 years experience were not a lot more successful with 30% of the anemones dying in an average of 7 months. Only 5% of those surveyed with 2-5 years experience had kept their anemone for two years or more.
Even among hobbyists with more than 5 years experience, 36% of anemones kept were dead after an average of 8 months.
One in 6 anemones in the survey reached the 24 months in captivity milestone.
Only one out of every 13 anemones in the survey had been in captivity for 3 years or more.
One in every 32 reached 5 years in captivity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Copied from a survey conducted by Joyce Wilkerson (renowned clownfish breeder) quite a few years ago. I would imagine that the numbers have changed somewhat given the advances in reefkeeping but IMO too many anemones die needlessly in our tanks. With a natural potential lifespan of a hundred years or so, our success at keeping them in captivity is dismal. Anemones are among the most difficult animals to keep longterm. You should be well in the advanced stages of this hobby before attempting to keep anemones.

The survey from volunteers showed that

45% of anemones kept by hobbyists with less than 2 years of marine aquarium keeping experience were dead after an average of 3 months.

Those hobbyists with 2-5 years experience were not a lot more successful with 30% of the anemones dying in an average of 7 months. Only 5% of those surveyed with 2-5 years experience had kept their anemone for two years or more.

Even among hobbyists with more than 5 years experience, 36% of anemones kept were dead after an average of 8 months.

One in 6 anemones in the survey reached the 24 months in captivity milestone.

Only one out of every 13 anemones in the survey had been in captivity for 3 years or more.

One in every 32 reached 5 years in captivity.
That's just sad. Where just killing them :-(
 

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What are the rest of your levels? Ca, Alk, pH, Mg.

If everything is good then more light and more food would be the answer IME.

Ya when you feed them they make a mess. It is just what they do. Keep feeding multiple times a week. Direct feedings can help to accommodate for the low light you have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
400 ppm CA well i try to keep it that high. 1300 mg and 8.3 ph and I do water chang every two weeks with pre-mix water
 

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Not easy to keep in smaller tank because of keeping all the parameters steady.
+1, THis is likely the biggest reason you have problems. Nems need very stable conditions. Anything less than a 30 gallon tank is not really a good fit for a nem. You don't mention tests for nitrate. It is not likely you have a skimmer on a tank that small and it does not take much food to murk up a 14 gallon (which is likley less than 10 gallons of actual water).
 

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I think 30 is around the minimum. I am certainly not going to say Jnicho is wrong to cut a little under because he likely knows what he is doing and recognizes the challenges. I think technically you could keep on that the nem barely fit in if you had close enough controls in place. I would certainly not reccomend a 24 as the first tank you keep a nem in. I am certainly no expert on nems. I have a 30 and have waffled back and forth on getting one knowing my setup is marginal to keep them. After I add a sump and my system volume is nearly doubled, I may reconsider it.
 

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its a fuzzy pic but this is the only Nem I have at the moment. I hear some of the non hosting nems are more forgiving. Perhaps a tube nem or condy may be a good practice nem to try in less than ideal setups.
 

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I think 30 is around the minimum. I am certainly not going to say Jnicho is wrong to cut a little under because he likely knows what he is doing and recognizes the challenges. I think technically you could keep on that the nem barely fit in if you had close enough controls in place. I would certainly not reccomend a 24 as the first tank you keep a nem in. I am certainly no expert on nems. I have a 30 and have waffled back and forth on getting one knowing my setup is marginal to keep them. After I add a sump and my system volume is nearly doubled, I may reconsider it.
Agreed...that was kind of the point I was trying to make...I've been at this quite a while and the BTA in the AP24 is not my first nem either...even given that info the BTA in the small tank has been a challenge...Condy's are a mixed bag...while they are more forgiving they seem to wander around more especially in lower light tanks...I also have a tube nem (hence my avatar pic)...maybe it was just that particular specimen, but the first six weeks I had that guy I would have to say he was one of the most challenging animals I've every kept...once he and I finally reached an agreement he has been fine and quite easy to keep, LOL!...I'm not sure what I would consider a "starter" nem...like so many things, you really have to research and make sure you are able to meet or exceed the needs of these animals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
+1, THis is likely the biggest reason you have problems. Nems need very stable conditions. Anything less than a 30 gallon tank is not really a good fit for a nem. You don't mention tests for nitrate. It is not likely you have a skimmer on a tank that small and it does not take much food to murk up a 14 gallon (which is likley less than 10 gallons of actual water).
There is a skimmer on the tank. and a chiller as well This tank has been mod and I have an extra nano koralia power head in the tanks and gives a good flow in the water
 

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so are temp, alk, and nitrates maintained pretty constant? Do you have the heater and chiller on a controller? Generally the dwonfall of a small system is its instability. WHat kind of skimmer is it? do you test your nitrates?
 
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