The Reef Tank banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Soo I purchased a medium size CPR aquafuge 2 hob refugium that comes with the a protein skimmer and I was wondering what should I put inside the refugium im deciding between rubble rock or miracle mud? Which one is better? And if miracle mud how many inches of it?
 

·
Export with Care!
Joined
·
6,789 Posts
Honestly empty is best but depends what your trying to achieve with it. Miracle mud/ sand ect just build up nutrients and make it harder to clean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,232 Posts
rubble will suffice. Do you have a sump as well?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,738 Posts
as invic suggested, id leave it empty. imo, the best way to reduce nitrates is with a siphon and a water change. macro algae isnt the best phosphate/nitrate reducer. it is "leaky". yes, it will absorb some nitrates and phosphates, but it also releases them back into the water column.

the stability is a valid point. any extra water volume will act as a buffer for things like pH, salinity, and temp swings.

as for a place to grow pods, not so sure. ive read that not many make it from the refugium into the display.

also, think of this. you are trying to reduce nitrates and nutrients in general, right? why would you want to add something to your system(macro algae, pods) that prefer high nutrient environments? if you want to grow pods, id use a separate tank all together.

here is a good discussion on refugiums. it gets a little heated at times, so look out......lol
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
447 Posts
If I am not mistaken the Hob refugium is a hang on the side or back style refugium. The capacity will be limited. If I hear what you are saying you want to grow pods and reduce nitrates and phosphates in the main tank.

To reduce the nitrates in the main tank, you will be better to add more live rock into the main tank. Live rock has an effect on the nitrates, to grow out pods and reduce phosphates you need to add a macro algae into your Hob set-up, while the macro algae will remove some nitrates it's capacity is limited and so will the removal of nitrates. Tiger pods and amphipods will grow rather quickly in the macro algae. Depending on where you live, there are various types of macro algae available to you, some work better than other. Spaghetti algae is the one of choice here in California as the best ones are banned because they don't want them to get into the coastline.

Sorry but once I post there will be a flood of people that come on the site to dispute what I say. What I say comes from what the experts are saying these days. Good luck guy, and again I appolgize in advance.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,738 Posts
macro algae doesn't really "reduce" nutrients in the system like people think. if there are excess nutrients in the tank, the algae grows, if there is no nutrients, the algae dies. so to have the algae grow, you are already loosing the battle and the nutrients are already in the water available to all algae. and macro algae doesn't really "remove" anything from the water. it "binds" nutrients. an important distinction, I think, as what is bound can very quickly become unbound.

the best way to keep nutrients low in a system is to remove the detritus before it has a chance to rot and become food for any algae at all.

more rock may work to reduce nitrates a bit, but nitrates aren't really the enemy here. phosphates are. the best way to lower them is to keep them out in the first place by removing detritus, and adding rock may hinder the ability to remove detritus effectively. nothing wrong with more rock, but don't add too much where you cant keep the sand bed siphoned and clean.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,284 Posts
I have to agree with Guitar here. Chaeto and the other macro algae will grow if theres excess of nutrients. If your tank is growing them then you might need to watch what youre feeding since that means theres an over abundance in the tank. Clean more of the detritus up and if youre just starting out on your tank you can even do rock lifts. This is where the rocks arent placed flat on the bottom of the tank but instead on sort of a lift system where you can keep the flow under the rocks going as well so detrius dont settle.

Here's a good rule, dont add what you cant test for in your system. Ive heard good and bad about the mud as well. Honestly, what kind of system is this and what all does it entail? Fish only? Coral? LPS/SPS/etc? This will help with what we can offer for advice as most setups are different.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
46,687 Posts
.

Sorry but once I post there will be a flood of people that come on the site to dispute what I say. What I say comes from what the experts are saying these days. Good luck guy, and again I apologize in advance.
Someone has an inflated sense of importance? Who are these "EXPERTS" and what are they saying these days?
There is a world of difference between dispute and discussion.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,746 Posts
Soo I purchased a medium size CPR aquafuge 2 hob refugium that comes with the a protein skimmer and I was wondering what should I put inside the refugium im deciding between rubble rock or miracle mud? Which one is better? And if miracle mud how many inches of it?
Personally I would not use either of those. The bacteria required for detitrification requires low oxygen zones which aren't created in small pieces of rock. It requires larger which don't generally fit in an HOB fuge.

Mud generally needs refreshed and ends up being a chore and an expense.

My recommendation is to grow macro algae. Though others have their own experiences I have found it to be a wonderful addition to my tanks over the years. It locks nutrients into it which keeps them from being used by micro algae and once you harvest some it's completely removed from the tank. If you have low enough nutrients that the algae might die off, then you simply remove it before it dies quickly and easily eliminating any danger of it returning those stored nutrients to the tank as it dies.

Macro also provides a great place for pods to breed and grow and when kept on a light cycle opposite of the tank helps to keep pH balanced around the clock as photosynthesis affects pH.

If you plan on keeping creatures in the fuge that burrow then you can add a sand bed. I would still recommend keeping it shallow. My sump is two 20 gallon long tanks hooked together. One of them is a fuge. It has one small chamber with cheato and the large chamber has sand, large rocks, and a small "leaf" species of caulerpa that I haven't identified yet. Not verticulata but similar in size.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I use Miricle Mud and macro algae and it keeps my nitrates down and it isn't a problem cleaning this refugium either Just un-plug the pump's unstick the suction cups of the intake pump then take to.your sink or tub and clean. These products will not leach anything back into the main tank until the nutrients are depleted so yo just need to replace the mud according the directions. As for growing copepods in it I have no problem with that either just keep a decent amount of macro algae in it and you should be good to go and they have no problem getting into the main system. The problem is when you have them bellow in a sump that most don't make it to the tank not with the HOB refugium.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I also wanted to say that this refugium is just as big as many sump refugiums I have seen in person and on YouTube, that are successful this one is not as deep but it's as wide as most and deeper so it holds if not as much water very close to it.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top