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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
how do I convert 600 mililiters into miligrams?
 

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10mg = 1ml
or
1 ml = 10mg

so if you are starting with ml and need to convert to mg, mulitply by 10. if you need to convert mg to ml divide by 10.

did i say that right ?

anyway, i did a search on google, and that was the conversion 10mg=1ml
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Jay, you saved me from having to beg TD for a lesson in Pharmacology ;)
 

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Ummmm, I'm not absolutely positive, but I think that one milliliter of water weighs one gram, not ten milligrams. Therefore, one thousand mls (one liter) would weigh 1 kilogram, about 2.2 pounds. Since a liter is about a quart, the weights work out for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Chip, its not about weights
its a pharm dosage conversion question
"9. If a patient is a using respiratory medication that consists of 3 mls of a 0.01% solution and Home Medical, Inc is providing 200 doses per month, what is your monthly billing in milligrams?"
 

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good to hear doug, for a second i thought i gave you bad info.. when i did the search, it actually took me to a meds dosing page.. here is the full text :

The order is to give 1/8 gr of morphine sulfate IM q4h p.r.n. for pain. On hand are ampules labeled 10 mg per 1 ml. How many milliliters should you give?

Step 1: State the problem in equation form.



Step 2: Identify the conversion factors needed to convert from grams to milliliters. Two conversion factors are needed:

A. Convert from grams to milligrams.

1 gr = 60 mg

B. Convert from milligrams to milliliters.

10 mg = 1 ml

Step 3: Dose on hand is 1 ml = 10 mg

Step 4: Put into the equation:



Step 5: Cancel labels that are the same on denominator and denominator.



Step 6: Compute math



Therefore, 0.75 ml will provide the ordered dose.

oh yeah, found it here : http://www.utep.edu/nurs4710/tutorials/math/test.htm
 

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Egad, Jay! Now I have a headache! :eek: :eek:

Everybody ought to have some beliefs...I believe I'll have a beer.... hehehe
 

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Sorry, misunderstood. I still think that 1 ml of water weighs 1 gram, but it's been ages since I learned metric.
 

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just want to make sure no one is getting confused here, the sample that Jay gave is ONLY for morphine sulfate which happens to have a density of .1mg/mL. You cannot just take 1mg/10 mL and use that in any problem, those are the given values in the example and are not an actual conversion factor as it seems to be presented in the post. Doug, what is the density of the solution. This must be known as you cannot convert mg to mL, one is mass, the other volume. You have to have a density to relate the values, as Jay had in his example. Jay, sorry if I am misreading your post, but 10 mg = 1 mL is not correct in all cases, only in the example given.
 

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oh yeah Chip Wick, you are correct, the density of water is 1 g/ cm^3(mL), well at 3.98 degrees C that is, since the density of water falls as it approaches freezing.
 

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But the real question is:

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

Q: How tall is the average woodchuck?

A: 20inches

Q: how much does the average woodchuck weigh

A: 16lbs

Q: How long is a woodchuck's gestation period?

A:2,592,000 seconds or 720 hours or 30 days

Q: How wide is the average woodchucks paw

A: 4 cm
 

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mike, you read my post correctly. it wasn't my answer, jsut one i found on the web/ i'm glad yo ustated that, because i was under the impression, from that page, that 10mg-1ml. so yes, i would have forever figured that wasa standard and would always be.

thanks for clearing it up!!

now hopefully doug didn't ACTUALLY dose someone or something based on that formula!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Not to worry I have a GAWD AWFUL tolerence ;)
Actually JAys answer put me on the right track, I just had to shift the decimal point to account for the actual drug content of 1% so the correct answer was 60 mg not 6000 or 600
 

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Mike is correct.. Density comes into play when calculating between volumen and weight, or visa-versa.

just as an FYI, www.convert-me.com happens to be an awesome website for converting dang near any unit of measure into any unit of measure (of the same measurement type)

HTH
 

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You still need to know the density of the 100% drug solution, without the density muliplied through you cannot get a measurement of mass. If they didn't give you the density, this problem is a hack:D, and the work that you did is absolutely meaningless. the way you have to do it is: 3 mL (solution) * 1 mL (drug) / 100 mL (solution) * 200
from this you get 6 mL (drug) (I am assuming this is where you got 60, but I still don't see how that could have happened, unless the 1% solution was wrong, I guessed it wasn't the .01% as previously stated since you said it both ways I assumed you meant 1%)
But we still are stuck with mL of pure drug here, so we must have the density of the pure drug in order to get the mass. So the answer may be 60 mg if you looked it up or something, but you must do it the way shown above, and the density must be 10 mg / mL. To do it just by multiplying through and tacking on the mg unit is incorrect.
If the book this is from didn't give you the density and said the answer was 60 mg, throw it away, it was written by a half-retarded ape child.

Sorry for all this but incorrect units really get my panties in a bunch.
:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
"9. If a patient is a using respiratory medication that consists of 3 mls of a 0.01% solution and Home Medical, Inc is providing 200 doses per month, what is your monthly billing in milligrams?"
3 mlsx200 doses =600 mls 1% of that is 6 mils(actual med in solution) so 10 mg per Mil =60 mg
which is how medicare insists this med be billed
Thats the right answer on the test, I SUCK at math so I did it by hints and deductive reasoning ;)
And No this was extra credit, I dont have to dose others in my work, as stated my tolerence is fine ;)
 
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