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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
buying 6 month used 60 gallon hex tank, and have been looking at different livestock, live rock, and other stuff. Does everyone buy their saltwater at the lfs? or can you make it yourself? thanks josh
 

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ICH is work of the DEVIL
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in my opinion (IMO).... i would never buy a "hex" anything for a salt water application. hex's are skinny width-wise but tall/deep.

TWO MAJOR PROBLEMS:

1) the deeper the tank the more&more lighting wattage you need to keep corals alive....like double the wattage of a standard rectangle reef tank.

2) most saltwater fish need room to swim.... although a hex is deep, its not wide at all. most fish you will want to buy just wont have the swimming room to be happy and healthy. saltwater fish want lots of horizontal room to swim left and right.

if you are going the route of a "reef tank".... please please please consider a long rectangle tank.... i have a 75gal... its 4ft wide and 19in deep.... this is the type of tank you need.

if you are set in your mind to buy the hex.... i would make it a FOWLR (fish only with live rock) with NO CORALS.... again with the hex being so tall you will FOREVER fight getting lighting to go that deep....and you'll be limited on actively swimming fish feeling crowded

please reconsider your purchase on the hex.

p.s. if you buy any used tank.... you must must must have the seller show you a water-test.... have the seller put the tank in his/her garage and fill it up half way with a hose and watch it for leaks for 1hr. if it leaks, say "bye" to the seller and jump in your car. if it doesnt leak, help the seller syphon/bucket the water out.

good luck
 

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Welcome to TRT!!

I agree with the "Hex" coment but if you already got it is too late. What are you planing to keep in it?
I think most people just mix their own saltwater. I do.
 

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Welcome to TRT Josh! Like Little Luey said above, almost everyone makes their own salt water unless they have access to really cheap premade salt water. Keep in mind that you would have to buy fresh water as well to replace the evaporated water from your tank. Most of us make our freshwater which we then mix into saltwater using our own reverse osmosis/deionization filters, or use for replacing evaporated water.
 

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BTW, I agree, if you can avoid a hex tank, you will avoid a lot of headaches if you intend to keep corals and larger fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
just getting started

I got a pretty good deal on the tank that is already set up, I was goung to start with a 240 gallon tank but figured its bettter to get a smaller one make it a reef non-aggressive tank and keep some small cool(cheaper) fish in it for my kids until I get my feet wet. by the way any suggestions in what kind of salt to use? seasalt, iodonized, uniodonized? ect and where to get it? thanks
 

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NFMAS
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A friend of mine keeps a nice reef hex tank. Its more like a nano tank but you can still keep a nice reef in a hex tank. You just won't be able to keep the larger fish that require more room. Plus you will out grow it quickly. You will do ok with gobys, jawfish, etc. If its a good deal go with it because it won't be your last tank and it will be a great learning tool.

As for the salt you want to get sea salt mix from your pet store. I use oceanic but any will do. Also don't use tap water. You can get by with distilled water form the supermarket or from a water machine that charges 25 cents a gallon. I did that for years until I bought a RO/DI water filter.

Another point is that you should not go larger than 75 gallons for your first tank. Keeping tanks larger than that requires more work and funds to keep it going. You might get burned out with a 240 for your first tank. Work your way up so that you know what you are getting into
 

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I've got the REEF rash!
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Welcome to TRT! I've seen some nice hex reef with Mh lights and the fish could go all the way around the tank with the rocks in the middle.and you can make or buy ready made saltwater,either way works!
 

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Welcome to TRT!!

there are many different sizes of hex's with different dimensions. Hex's can be quite the display if done right. they do tend to be better for fish than corals, but that is mainly if you plan on having a huge number of different corals. Hex's are great at showing off a single, or a few specimens that have been allowed to grow "naturally". you are able to see around them more due to the angles sizes.

i mix my own SW. most LFS make thier salt up at ridiculously low S.G.'s. :(

G~
 

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Welcome to TRT Josh,

take a look at this article in the FAQ. this will help answer some of the question you will come up with and may you ask more too.
i had a 62 Hex for a long time. it can be done but is a major headacke for a reef. if you want only fish ( no live rock) go for it. but try a 55g instead, you can get one pretty cheap on a days. because of how deep the hex tanks are you will have trouble lighting it for just about any type of corals, the the cleaning of it......

as for the salt, go to the LFS ( local fish store) and pick up a bucket or bag of salt, ( instant ocean, reef crystals, Oceanaic.etc...)
you will need a hydromiter to , this will measure the SG level of the salt , try and get a refractometer instead of the swing arm, the cheap plastic swing arm are usally off big time...
 

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I think there was a poll on here not too long ago and most people use Instant Ocean brand of salt mix to make their saltwater. Very important to not use tap water without treating it or filtering it first. Tap water contains chlorine and potential undesirable chemicals and metals such as phosphates, copper, silica, etc. A reverse osmosis/ deionization filter will remove those substances. Like Tim stated above, it is very important to be able to measure the specific gravity or salinity of your saltwater and to keep it as stable as possible.
 
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