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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Help me out guys, why is this stuff turning yellow on me? I noticed it last week, a small amount of grape caluerpa that got intertwined with a clump of cheato was yellow. Didnt think much of it, just ripped it off and chucked it. But today, in the 2nd section of my 55 gallon fuge where I have the bulk of the caluerpa, about 20% of the macro had gone yellow. Is this bad? Does it just mean there isnt enough nutrients to support it? IS it dying? What can i do to fix it, just prune out the yellow stuff?
 

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Carpe Noctem
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Sounds like it could be an iron deficiency, a lighting issue or just not enough nutrients for the amount of algae you have. Are you running your lights on a schedule or 24/7?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sounds like it could be an iron deficiency, a lighting issue or just not enough nutrients for the amount of algae you have. Are you running your lights on a schedule or 24/7?
No Im running them 12-14 hours over the fige, opposite the lighting of the MT. It went sexual on me, just came across a good deal of info on it and it seems the fuge has done such a good job depleting the system of phosphates, it made the algae go into sexual mode.

I yanked most of it and just left a green-only mat of it that has anchored to a large leather coral skeleton. I know caulerpa can release toxins into the water that can harm corals. What corals I do have (mainly softies and polyps/zoo's) seem fine.

Any advice on how to deal with this in the future? Keep it pruned I guess. The bigger the mass gets, the more nutrients it needs to sustain growth. So keep smaller amounts?

Also I was wondering about coralline algae and other desireable reef organisms that use phophate for growth. With all this macro sucking up all available nutrients, Im assuming there wont be much left for the desireable stuff. Is it as much of a pain in the butt as it seems, to keep a happy balance? What about adding phosphates, does anyone do that?
 

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Carpe Noctem
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My goodness no... You don't want to add po4. Having unhappy macro is technically a good thing;) I would just keep smaller amounts. Your goal is to have a happy tank, not a full fuge...
 

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I yanked most of it and just left a green-only mat of it that has anchored to a large leather coral skeleton. I know caulerpa can release toxins into the water that can harm corals. What corals I do have (mainly softies and polyps/zoo's) seem fine.
If all your corals are doing fine, what makes you believe that caulerpa releases toxins that can harm coral? If that were true, wouldn't your corals be reacting negatively? Here's a thread on the subject if you're interested. http://www.thereeftank.com/forums/f77/tom-i-have-a-question-4-u-or-anyone-else-126855.html

Any advice on how to deal with this in the future? Keep it pruned I guess. The bigger the mass gets, the more nutrients it needs to sustain growth. So keep smaller amounts?
It sounds like you have it figured out.:agree:

Also I was wondering about coralline algae and other desireable reef organisms that use phophate for growth. With all this macro sucking up all available nutrients, Im assuming there wont be much left for the desireable stuff. Is it as much of a pain in the butt as it seems, to keep a happy balance? What about adding phosphates, does anyone do that?
You add phosphate to the system every time you feed the tank. It doesn't matter what food you're using. There's phosphate in it. There's no need to add phosphate directly.

It isn't as difficult to keep a happy balance as it may seem. Caulerpa is self adjusting. It uptakes nutrients as it grows. The higher the abundance of nutrients, the faster it grows. When nutrients are low, it grows slower. You run into problems when you have to much Caulerpa in the system. The system you have can only support "X" amount of Caulerpa. It's easy for a large amount of Caulerpa to cross that boundary where there are no longer enough nutrients in the water to sustain it. A large amount of Caulerpa will have many growing tips. Even if the growth of each tip is slow because of low nutrients, you can add up the growth of each tip and come up with quite a bit of overall growth. Before you know it, there's not enough nutrients in the water to sustain it and it crashes. If you keep the algae harvested, it will help keep nutrients down, and reduce the risk of it crashing.

I do have a question though. You describe what you are seeing as the Caulerpa turning yellow. The only time I've seen it turn yellow is when it gets exposed to air. When it crashes, it becomes clear and releases a milky looking substance. Are you sure your Caulerpa crashed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I dont know if it crashed, its just, yellow. About 2/3's is still bright green. Its just a third of it that has gone yellow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Seems the tint has cleared up. SKimmer got it i guess. All is a-ok again :)

Just those hydroids im still trying to figure out what to do with..
 
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