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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
About 9 months ago I started hearing the "clicking"... bad news.

Local advice was to take all live rock out and put it in a bucket with a few inches of water and it would crawl out of it's hole. Didn't happen...major hassel...who know's what else died on my live rock during this period even though I did spray it to keep it moist.

Extremely annoyed, I put all the rock back in and started wathcing for the thing with a red flashlight at night after the tank lights were out.

Only took another 3 months to find it! I saw 2 "antennas" with eyes on the end and knew I'd found it.

Took that 1 piece of live rock out and sprayed tunnels and holes with stream of baking soda mixed with water. The shrimp came charging out in about 2 seconds.

Anyway, this thing has been out of the tank for a while but I'm just now getting around to posting a picture of it. It was about 1.5" if I recall.

Maybe someone can confirm if it is really a Mantis.

Mike
 

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Sure is! Congrats. I finally rid my tank of the last one a few months ago. Now if I could just figure out what's killing every cleaner shrimp I put in there.....
 

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Ughhh.. Dinoflagelettes..
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If he's still living, I know someone on the forumn was looking for one...

And yes, people actually want to keep these things... :)
 

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Darn BeachMutts,

I would've been happy to drive up and pick it up. I've been thinking about putting one in my 2 1/2 gallon for fun.
 

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They are killers of fish etc. That's why I would only put it in the little tank.
 

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Mantis shrimps (stomatopods) are actually really interesting critters, very smart (for a shrimp), hardy, and they have one of the most intricately developed visual systems of anything out there. Unfortunately, they are excellent predators, and tend to hide when they think that someone's after them, which is often the case. Their strikes (the clicking sound) is one of the fastest movements in the animal kingdom, and it's said the blow from a large one has the power of a .22 bullet. Hence the name "thumbsplitter". They're also edible, but usually only when they're larger than the ones in your average reef tank.
 

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LOL that's the first time I've heard of them being edible, wonder if they're good with garlic and butter =)
 

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Yeah, I attended a lecture last year on "spectral tuning of vision in mantis shrimps" at the University of Maine (visiting lecturer), and the first slide he had was a picture of a plate of mantis shrimp tails (I think it was taken in France, so probably butter and garlic WERE involved). They were quite large, the tails alone were probably six inches long. That'd make a heck of a snapping noise!
BTW, the gist of the lecture was that the visual systems of mantis shrimp are much better able to detect a wide range of light than ours (uv down through infrared, if I'm remembering correctly), and that they're able to "tune" their vision to compensate for the shifting preponderences of wavelengths at different depths. That way, they're able to communicate visually with each other no matter what the depth. Like I said, interesting critters...
 

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Whoa, with visual ability like that, it brings to mind the "through the creatures eyes" scenes in the movie "Predator"
They are fascinating creatures in their own right, and definatly worth a species tank, esp the more colorful variety :)
 
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