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Discussion Starter #1
i just got home a bit ago and found my torch like this. The top brand as you see is not out at all and has a nasty film coming out of it. The one behind it is out a little. The other ones are like it usually is at night. The tooth coral looks fine. I just tested the water and as usual its fine. Ammonia is 0 nitrite is 0 nitrate is about 15 and specific grafity is 1.024??????????is it just because i just got it saturday or what im lost????????
 

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More than likely just settling in. Give it a few more days. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thats what i thought but what is the light brown oooz coming out of the top branch. The tank temp was 82 with my ebo jager set to 79 so i turned it down to 76 incase that was a problem
 

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Little fish in a big pond
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Brown Jelly - it's a protozoan infestation quite common on Euphyllia sp.

I would frag off the affected heads, and do an iodine dip to help disinfect it. Catch it fast before it spreads to all the heads.

HTH

Jenn
 

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Discussion Starter #5
are you kidding me i live in the country . One my lfs is an hour away and will be closed before i get there. If thats the case i have a 5 day policy on it. It will go back tomorrow is thats the case. I dont know how to frag it or dip it......and yes its a brown jelly like substance
 

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82 is pretty warm - that's not going to help it either. Break the skeleton off to remove the sick polyp, at least try that.

Jenn
 

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Discussion Starter #7
so you want me to take it out of the tank and"break" the branch of with my hands ?
 

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Little fish in a big pond
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Yep. If it's too tough to do with your hands you can use pliers, hacksaw, or better yet a dremel.

Put on safety glasses if you dremel - it will smell like burning hair or bones and there will be chips flying.

Jenn
 

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Discussion Starter #9
i talked to that fish place, my LFS, and they said it isnt a problem bringing it back but if i do what you say i have no more policy on it. So sorry to say not doing that. 59.99 is alot of money to me.
 

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Also, if you have any other Euphyllia sp. in your tank (torch, hammer, frogspawn) keep a close eye. That junk is contagious. It's not unique to Euphyllia but they seem the most prone to it. Other coral species *can* get it. I wouldn't worry too much about others unless you have other Euphyllia in there - but just keep a close eye.

When you can get to a LFS, you can get Kent Tech D or Seachem Reef Dip and follow the instructions to bathe the coral. Do NOT put either of these substances in your tank - you scoop out water to do the bath, then discard it afterwards.

If they don't have either of those, you can use Lugol's solution (very powerful - be careful with that stuff and again don't put the bath water back in the tank!!!) or even any iodine additive will work in a pinch.

My first vote would be Tech D since you're not experienced at it (or Reef Dip).

Jenn
 

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i talked to that fish place, my LFS, and they said it isnt a problem bringing it back but if i do what you say i have no more policy on it. So sorry to say not doing that. 59.99 is alot of money to me.
*Sigh* the LFS would rather let it die and/or infect other things in your tank rather than honour their guarantee after you try to save the rest of the coral. Figures... (and I own a LFS).

Well, if they're willing to eat a total loss, I guess, let them. Just keep an eye on your other corals - I'd hate to see it turn into a major problem for you.

I would lower the temperature though - 82 is warm and will stress that coral - Euphyllias don't like heat, and the stress of that plus the protozoan infestation it might all be dead in short order.

Too bad - nice piece, and likely salvageable at this point.

Jenn
 

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Discussion Starter #12
i hate to kill it. It is a very nice torch but at the same time its 60.00 and i have that policy on it so you know. the only other coral in my tank is a tooth coral. I did lower the setting on my heater from 79 to 76
 

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Heh I've just spent several *days* arguing with Race Foster over guarantees and how they harm the hobby... sadly your situation illustrates my argument to a tee. Sorry - not trying to criticize or anything - given your two choices, you're taking the most logical one. If not for the guarantee it would be more to your advantage to try to salvage the remainder of the coral :(

*Hopefully* if you return it to the LFS, they *will* try to save it. That would be the best outcome. Keep us posted.

Jenn
 

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Discussion Starter #14
at this point in my life college and all if there wasnt that policy on it i wouldnt have bought it. I would just have polyps and mushrooms. the cheaper stuff
 

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I don't get it you asked for help(opps you asked God to help) and then when someone tells you what needs to be done you deside to let it be ,and die and maybe kill other things in your tank?Did I miss something?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
no i desided based opon the information given i would NOT let it die and or kill other things in my tank by taking it to my LFS who are equiped and according to who i talk to will save it. that gives me my money back and saves whats in my tank
 

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Let's not flame the poster ;)

In my opinion, the *best* case scenario would be for the hobbyist to take the advice, frag the coral and attempt to save it.

However, given his choices, with the option of a no-fault guarantee, he's taking the most *logical* economical choice.

Is it the most ethical? Perhaps not. That was my argument against such guarantees. I don't wish to make this poster or situation into an example - that's counterproductive. All I will say is that given the choices available, many (most?) would choose the same option.

Again - I don't want to capitalize on the hobbyist's misfortune. I sympathize. It stinks to get a sick specimen. Experience will teach this person to keep a closer eye and watch out for this symptom going forward - so to that end we're teaching him about one of the illnesses that crops up in corals. I don't blame him for taking the choice that makes the most fiscal sense. I do find it unfortunate, however, that in doing so, a specimen that *can* be hard to come by (CITES quota limits etc) may perish when it could have been saved.

Like I said - best case scenario, if the LFS staff are savvy, when the coral is returned, as long as the pathogen hasn't spread to other branches, it still can be fragged, disinfected and possibly saved.

It could well be that the jelly has or is already spreading to the other heads too- in which case the coral will likely perish - it's hard to tell with a single photo. Even if the hobbyist tries to save it, it might not work - but IMO it's worth a try.

Again - I'm not trying to make an example of anyone so I hope nobody construes it that way. It's just odd timing that this type of situation/choice comes up hot on the heels of a days long debate I've been in ;)

Jenn
 

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I would snap off the dead branch while it is still in the tank and just watch the other heads. There is a good chance that polyp was damaged in shipping and the rest of the coral will be ok. This is not an unusal event with branching euphylia. I would not use a dremmel, it can heat up the coral through friction and cause damage. Anyway, I don't think the chance of infection to the rest of the coral is that bad. I would check my nitrates. Hammers and torches are great at letting you know how your water quality is. Good luck whatever you decide to do.
 

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I would snap off the dead branch while it is still in the tank and just watch the other heads. There is a good chance that polyp was damaged in shipping and the rest of the coral will be ok. This is not an unusal event with branching euphylia. I would not use a dremmel, it can heat up the coral through friction and cause damage. Anyway, I don't think the chance of infection to the rest of the coral is that bad. I would check my nitrates. Hammers and torches are great at letting you know how your water quality is. Good luck whatever you decide to do.

not to be disagreeable, but taking a dremel to any euphyllias skeleton surely wont hurt a thing. It is the best way to frag them as they all have varying degrees of brittleness and hardness and dont alway break exactly how you want them. I cant tell you how many times I have went to get however many heads off of euphyllia or caulastrea and ended up breaking it where i didnt want it to.

Dremels are precise and the best way to do it. Some break easily where you want...but not all.

Brown jelly disease is brown jelly disease. doing nothing is not how it is to be dealt with. If youve ever wathced it jump from head to head you would know this. It needs out of the tank ASAP. This is more important the more specimens in the tank prone to the disease that you have of course
 

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After rereading the original post here I feel like a complete idiot. Totally missed part of what was said and advised wrong. Glad you came in JennM and made up for my bad advice. Thank You.
 
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