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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well actually I'm asking is there any discovery been made to the existence of freshwater corals, specifically scleractinian corals? And why not?

Btw, I know that jellyfish do exist.

Brian
 

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Yes I have seen FW jellies but I do not think that caoral will evolve to become FW species. Fresh water is lacking the building blocks for calcification that is required for stony corals to grow Specifically the Alkalinity,Calcium, Magnesium and the correct PH...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't think alkalinity is the problem at all there are many carbonate FW lakes around the world with high calcium contents. The magnesium is part of what I thought could hinder the problem though.

As for mammals do you mean like seals. There are FW seals in Lake Baikal, btw, and silicate sponges.
Brian
 

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there are FW bivalves and even vertebrates are making bones but I agree that there isn't really the mineralization to make FW corals a viable competitor. Perhaps in a tropical FW that was very hard if they had been introduced at the right time to fill a niche but I have never heard of such a critter. just my 2 cents
 

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As for mammals do you mean like seals. There are FW seals in Lake Baikal, btw, and silicate sponges.
Brian
No, not mammals. Your question just seemed a bit odd. "Why havent freshwater scleractinian coral been found?" Well, if they don't exist, how would they be discovered? Same with a mermaid, no?

Seeing as a scleractinian coral is comprised of a calcium carbonate skeleton, I would not expect to find them in waters that do not provide the minerals needed to create said skeletons. A freshwater silicate based sponge exists because silicate is available. Show me a way that a scleractinian coral can get the minerals it needs other than through saltwater, and maybe you've discovered the freshwater coral. But I don't see how that's credible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OH, my bad, I read mammals not mermaids.

And btw, like the deep seas not all of the deep lakes have been explored either, deep sea corals weren't known to exist until discovered. And yss, calcium carbonate can contribute to many FW organisms' skeletons. Calcium is not the limiting factor in FW but I think rather magnesium and/or other elements also the Ksp (solubility product) of the FW not having the capacity to contain enough of all ions. Similar to what you said.

My question was more geared at if someone knows about the existence of FW corals. Evolution is quite tricky.

What about soft corals?

Brian

PS: And if you haven't seen any mermaids at your lakeside you're going to the wrong beach. jk
 
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