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I'll start with the issue of specific gravity. Per my LFS I have been told that since I am at a higher altitude I should keep the specific gravity in my tank at .020-.022. I know that the ocean is closer to .025. The rationalization regarding this is based on the fact that at altitude there is less oxygen. The higher the specific gravity, the lower the oxygen content. Couple that with the altitude issue and you have this school of thought. Does anyone have thoughts on this?

Next feeding regiments. I'm curious to find out how much and how often that members feed the fish in their tank. I try to feed small increments daily. I have heard that fish should be fed every other day. What are some of the thoughts on feeding?
 
G

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i got no comment about specific gravity, but here is how i feed my tank,
every other day (frozen brine) everythird day frzen ocean plankton mixed with flakes. once a week my mix (squid, scallops, salmon, brine, green alge/reg alge, krill...all blended up) every other day i dose dts and phyto (for corals)....i do not feed large amounts, just what ever can be eaten up in a 2 min time.
 

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I feed mine 2 days flakes, 1 day mix 1 day DTS plankton...Very little though...I only have a couple <><



-Paul
 

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Toadfish said:
...been told that since I am at a higher altitude I should keep the specific gravity in my tank at (1).020-(1).022... The rationalization regarding this is based on the fact that at altitude there is less oxygen. The higher the specific gravity, the lower the oxygen content...
I checked several sources including Millero and Tomascik and could not document the info on salinity significantly affecting O2 content of the water at such small differences in SG. If the pO2 of the atmosphere is lower, then the pO2 of the water will be at a corresponding lower level as well, and this is a function of altitude not Specific Gravity. I would be more concerned in your reef tank about the effect that altitude and lower SG/salinity would have on the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer system. With both a lower partial pressure of all gasses in the atmosphere (read here as pCO2) at Colorado altitudes, the saturation of CO2 in the water column will be proportionally affected. This will be seen as a decrease in your pCO2 (in the water column) and its effect on the pH and buffering of the tank. For every reduction in the chlorinity of carbonate species (by reducing both pCO2atmosphere and salinity), you will see a similar decrease in maximum potential total alkalinity, primarily Carbonate Alkalinity (as opposed to total alk including the borate and other components that would be minimally affected by these changes in altitude.) Although at higher salinities there is some effect on O2 saturation, it is relatively insignificant as a function of salinity at tank parameters. I would be more concerned about the effect on total max alkalinity when dropping the salinity.

If you'd like some fuel for the discussion, check out the Millero Text starting on Page 250, it gets into some of the GEOSECS info on both depth profiles and some of the related info based on depth/pressure/atmospheric pO2.

HTH
 

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:funny: :funny: I'm soooooo glad I wasn't the only one that had their hair parted with his post. WOW....I was reading it and it felt like a plane divebombed me! :funny:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
WOW....That's great info. Thanks for researching and taking the time to explain this to me. Again WOW!
 

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haahhhhaaahhhh...he said gases.

Actually I enjoy Tom's posts. I always get a great deal from it. Anways my main tank. 1.024-26 by refractometer (used to be 1.022-1.024 by hydrometer but it is off).
I feed reef mush once every day. I feed a coral mush with 5 or organisms target fed. (Coral mush is zooplankton, baby brine shrimp, phytoplankton, coral vite, adult brine shrimp,mysis shrimp and rotifers always in mixed amounts. I make enough for 4 tanks for a week the adult brine and mysis is mostly for sun polyps and my smaller plate and anemones. My larger anemone gets silversides about once every 3 days, or conditioned guppies (in saltwater)My clams and gorgonains get phytoplankton using the TDWyatt method of feeding (with the sawed bottom pop bottle). My bbs and rotifers and phtyo, I culture myself. I use kent's zooplankton and kent's coral vite and reef plus as additives.
My fish mush has shreded nori, shrimp with shells, zoe, marine c, kent's vitamin extract, the cube of the day (brine, emerald entree, squid, mysis, etc commercial stuff), mussels, fish, squid, ( I buy fish chunks for a dollar a pound and buy some clams, mussels and squid. And I blend it and add chunks and make frozen plates of it.

Ray
 

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Specific gravity is very dependent on temperature, even with a temperature correcting refractometer. Only the Salinity side of a temerature correcting refractometer is temperature corrected from what I've been able to find out. Try to keep the water between 34 and 36. I would not adjust it for the altitude because of O2.

Ray
 

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As to feeding. Most fish do best with 2 or more feedings a day. I feed most of my customer tanks ( use automatic feeders) 3 or 4 times a day. I also feed what almost everyone would call extreme overfeeding. In my personal opinion from 40 years keeping aquatic life; more fish die from starvation in our tanks than from overfeeding. I know that goes against all the books by "Experts".

Ray
 
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