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Discussion Starter #1
Hey! I have acquired a new fish tank and I would like to start a dwarf seahorse tank. U probably remember me. I wanted to start a 5 gal. Tank with dwarfs but I crumbled from excitement and just made a nano reef tank. It is doing OK. I'll make a thread about that tanks problems later. I don't believe it has too much danger.

Ok now to my dwarf. It is currently cycling. It has been cycling since the end of December and it is almost time to get it tested. I have done many many research in the. Dwarf seahorse and I really would like to have them. I told my family and they pitched in. I was given a TOM brine shrimp hatchery and brine shrimp eggs. They are doing nothing because I am waiting for the tank.

I might possibly make a brine tank. A salt 1 g for only the hatchery and hatch them and scoop them out and feed like that. I am open for any suggestions. I am trying really hard to make this happen this time.

I have 3 pounds if live rock and one has a mysterious coral. Idk what it is. I am currently trying to get rid of it. I have a few fellow friends that I think they would like it. Ok. It is staggered around the place and I think that it has a good lay out for keeping them. I got a heater yesterday only to find out that it has no temp controller. That is going back almost immediately. I am probably gonna get a thermometer.


Thanks for helping me!!!! I will take as much as help as I can get.



Oh yah!!! Where should I get the seahorses? For the past 3 times I checked, seahorses source is always out!!! I have a hard time finding captive bred seahorses. None of my LPS keep dwarf seahorses. Not surprising. But I also like some links to where I can get some. I am I'm no rush to get them fast. I want to so this right. Ok!!!
Thanks!!!!
 

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CONSTANTLY LEARNING
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Well first of all, different keepers have had different experiences that can affect the advice that is offerred.
For me, heaters are not necessary as they have less chance of bacterial infections when kept in the 68° to 74°F range which usually will fall within your home temperature.
If you have a mysterious coral on your rock it means the rock isn't sterile and you will most likely have to deal with dwarf killing hydroids down the road.
For dwarfs, most people would start with a sterile tank and then cycle, especially if they've already experienced hydroids.
I personally wouldn't use any hatcher meant to be in the tank as brine shrimp cysts are known carriers of nasty bacteria.
You should use decapped cysts if you are going to use it.
Also, I doubt that it will provide the density of feeding you need for dwarfs who much prefer their food to be dense enough to come by their hitch so they can snick it up without leaving their perch.
Rather than setting up a 1g tank for the brine, just juse 2L (or equivalent) pop (soda) bottles, inverted, with rigid air line tubing for circulation.
You'll need one each for hatching, growout and enriching.
I've been using them for over 20 yrs now.
Hatcher/Enricher
I recommend decapping or buying already decapped cysts and hatching them out.
After hatching, sieve them out and change the water before replacing them to grow for a day until they develop their digestive tract.
Then enrich them for at least a 12 hour stage, but preferrably two 12 hour stages with new water and enrichment for each stage.
Again sieve them and rinse before adding to the dwarf tank.
Seahorsesource.com is always my preffered source but if they are out, you can also get them at seahorsecorral.com.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Where I live, it's super hot in the summer and almost freezing in the winter.

On hatching brine shrimp. I was recommended to use the hatchery and I thought it was pretty clever. I was given decapsulated eggs.

How do I quarantine seahorses? I know I don't net them but I don't have a quarantine tank
 

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CONSTANTLY LEARNING
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It's not the outdoor temperature that you are concerned with, only the temperature in the home.
Here, I can have outdoor temperatures in the mid nineties and down to minus 20's. but I use air conditioning and heating to maintain a comfortable range in the home which keeps the seahorse tanks from getting above 74°.
Sure your hatcher and others that are meant for in tank hatching are clever, but still they present the problems that they may not provide the density needed, and if not using decapped cysts, then the possibility of nasty bacteria exists.
Also, you still need to enrich them after they reach the second Instar stage.
As for quarantine, you don't mention how many you are going to buy, or even what your tank size is, but a quarantine tank can be anything that holds sufficient water for the numbers of seahorses, along with open ended air lines for water movement. I've a friend that just uses betta containers for her fry that are born, with just aeration and artificial hitching. She changes the water every other day.
I still think you need to reconsider your present cycle and sterilize everything and then proceed with the cycle.
Remember too that I'm only one person's opinion so others may post differing opinions.
You can get the most views if you go to The Dwarf Forum.
Go to the bottom right hand corner and click on the "from:30 days" box and then click the "show all" from the pop up. This will give you PLENTY of dwarf threads to peruse.
Here is one thread from the end of 2014. http://forum.seahorse.org/index.php?showtopic=49191
You would have to join the org if you haven't already.
 

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CONSTANTLY LEARNING
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I personally use bleach.
I put everything in the tank that is going to be there when set up,(except seahorses of course) and dump in bleach, leaving it that way for a couple of days.
Then I rinse really well, and refill with water (no salt) and add some ClorAm-X or other suitable clorine remover, aerating it for a couple of days.
Then, a good rinse again and then set up the tank and refill with salt water adding ammonia to start the cycle.
Some people have used hydrogen peroxide, while others have boiled whatever is going into the tank.
If you go through the threads on seahorse.org's dwarf forum you may find other preferrences.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How much bleach?
How about the sand? I mean won't it mess it up?
It just feels weird. Bleach everything in there. And then I empty the water in there? I replace it with fresh water and then salt?
Tbh I'm confused
 

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If you mean by "mess it up" that the life forms in the sand will be killed off, yes.
The amount of bleach depends on the volume involved. There is no specific exact amount needed, but I'd say half a cup for 5g.
The bleach will kill off everything that is presently alive. That is the point.
You want to kill off any bacteria, but specifically any spores that can lead to hydroids once you start feeding live brine nauplii to the tank.
Once you neutralize after first rinsing well, then rinsing again after neutralizing, you can add the salt water and everything will be OK as adding ammonia as in liquid ammonia (with nothing else added to the ammonia) or as I use, ammonium chloride.
I don't know how to say it any simpler than I have.
You haven't been forthcoming on tank size and how many you wish to have, and this is the first time you've even mentioned sand.
Many dwarf hobbyists find it easier to clean the tank by keeping it bare bottom.
Have you joined seahorse.org yet? Have you read the older threads on the dwarf forum there?
You will probably find that some don't sterilize their dwarf set ups.
Depends on whether or not you want to take a chance on the hydroids.
Again, remember that this is my opinion on things and others don't agree.
You need to get on the org and see how many have had problems with hydroids and how hard it can be to get rid of them afterwards.
Don't rush the cycle as it may take you a month or two to accomplish fully.
 
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