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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Other than the obvious difference of all water on the floor or just a portion of water on the floor, are there any advantages/disadvantages of having the drain lines drilled in the back vs. the bottom?
 

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most glass tanks are tempered on the bottom, and therefore this is not an option. IMO the reason for drilling the bottom is less plumbing, and no it will not make a difference in the ammount of water on the floor if you do it right.
 

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Not sure, but a bottom overflow would skim surface water from 360 degrees if it wasn't against the back. I'm about the last to be an expert. I do know that most bottoms of tanks are tempered glass, which can't be drilled. Also maybe holes in the back cause less weakness than in the bottom. Really I'm just guessing, though.:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How about this: There are two tanks in front of you. One with holes in the bottom and the other with them in the back. Which one do you prefer and why.
 

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it depends. Do you wanna put it up against a wall? Is the sump in the stand? If so then bottom would be perfect. You can have it pretty much flush against the wall. In my situation where the sump will not be below the tank (on the 220) I would rather have the back drilled so that I can get the water to where I want to go in as straight a shot as possible. IMO it is all just a functionality standpoint.







ps- I may have just made up the word "functionality" not really sure though....
 

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I may have just made up the word "functionality" not really sure though....
yes but not to the detriment of the "truthiness" of the statement
 

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To me, the differences are negligable. I'd never buy a used tank just because it is drilled on back or bottom. Drilling on bottom though, I only feed comfortable with that from factory as a reef ready model.

Drilled on bottom may be important if your wanting to minimize how far from the wall the tank sticks out. Downside is the overflows are typically bigger than they have to be. Reef ready tanks costs more.

Drilled on back, takes up more room behind the tank, however since low pressure situations using uniseals vs. bulkheads can reduce this by several inches. A non-reef ready is more customizable and can make the overflow lower profile and in smaller spaces. For me, if buying a tank new and not used, I would rather buy non-reef ready and design where my overflows and drill myself exactly where I want them especially when running an external durso design.


So in summary, buying used I could care less. Buying new I would opt for non-reef ready so I can customize exactly with size/style overflows I want.
 

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Just make sure the back and/or sides aren't tempered either. They sometimes are.

Personally, I like drilling closer to the bottom, because I like durso stand pipes and overflow boxes. I've got one tank that is simply drilled and bulkeaded with an elbow and strainer and I do NOT like the way it drains OR skims the surface. It is quite ineffective.



My new 29G has been drilled lower, and I build an overflow box, much like I've done in the past. I'm putting together a durso this week. I like this type of configuration better:





I find that they do a much better job of skimming the surface, and you can do a lot more to quiet the system with an overflow box and durso.

Dave
 

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I like drilling closer to the bottom, because I like durso stand pipes and overflow boxes.

Dave
Funny you say that because I like the bulkhead placement as high as possible for the same exact reason the durso standpipe. The higher the bulkhead the less water pressure etc. on the hole.

I like to design the durso where the bulkhead/uniseal is just behind the elbow pointing down so the top of the bulkhead is actually drilled just and inch or less lower than the teeth of the overflow box. The rest of the durso ( The T and below ) are all external only the 90 elbow facing downward is in the tank. Overflow box in this case is very small, in your case the overflow box is much taller.
 

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I know what you are talking about.. I KIND of did that...externally, here...



D
 

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The last picture is the design but still looks like you have the bulkhead too low. Should be just 1 inch or less below the teeth of the overflow, to minimize the water noise falling into the overflow.
 

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Actually, that last picture is an external kind of durso I set up. The inside of the tank is the strainer and straw bulkhead in my first picture above.

Dave
 

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I put mine as high as i could and it seems to work very well. I believe this is what David is refering to.

 

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Yep yep yep...'cept it seems as if you have at least one (maybe a calfo full length) overflow box going and I used a simple elbow and strainer inside the tank.

Dave
 

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Mine is a full length overflow, but the right side plumbing (from the front of the tank) is seperated in the overflow for use in a CLS. The overflow has tons of surface skimming ability, with a very small amount of space taken up.
 

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Mine is a full length overflow, but the right side plumbing (from the front of the tank) is seperated in the overflow for use in a CLS. The overflow has tons of surface skimming ability, with a very small amount of space taken up.
Is this a 29 gal tank? Is the overflow DIY, how wide is it? Looks like a pretty good setup.
 

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No, mine is a 65 gallon so the overflow for the sump is about 30" long the other 6" is for the CLS. I built and installed the overflow myself. I had a local glass company drill the holes.
 
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