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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I keep getting this green/rusty brown algea mat groing on my sand bed i cant get rid of it. I'm ready to pul my hair out. Any ideas? Before you ask yes water quality is fine and the tank has been up and running for 1.5 years. I have had this problem since i started the tank. Yes I am using ro/di water. I'm at my witts end. Help......
 

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TRT Staff The Mominator
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Is it a dusting or a mat? If it looks like dust you've got diatom algae and it's probably an indicator the that membranes and such on the RO/DI need changing.

If it's a mat, that you could sphyon out in a clump or pick up with your fingers, you've got cyanobacteria.

From the "KIll Cyano Handbook" (LOL)
Reduce feeding
increase skimming
syphon the cyano out of the tank
blow the gunk/detritis out of the rocks with a turkey baster
remove the gunk via water changes
redirect powerheads to move more water to the areas affected with cyano

HTH,

Alice
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cool It is the Cyano then from what you say. Thanks I definitely need to get more water flow, that just reinforced my theory. So I was on the right trail thanks again.
 

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Kill Cyno

I also get a bit of a green mat on live sand below 250 W MH microreef. Are there real dangers and pitfalls of Cyno? Worse than just anoying? The stuff seems kind of cool but retains little gas bubbles. Looking for any thoughfull inpu. From my lab deep underground in Chicago. Jerry Aquaculture+
 

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Primitive biofilms ---usually a sleazy mix of diatoms, cyanobacteria, dinoflagellates, etc.--- are usually found taking advantage of light, of present nutrient, the fact that there's nothing to consume/disrupt them, and the fact that there's litle to compete with them for nutrients and light.

If you are putting in additives of any sort, it might be prudent to try cutting back on such, as well as anyother nutrient (like most food can produce)

The downside to most any unchecked biofilm is that it can choke off small, beneficial organisms beneath it. Any subsequent deaths dump more nutrient that the biofilm then exploits further.


hth,
horge
 

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re:
Were you refering to algea mat on live sand or calm surface areas in my sump. The two seem to be completelly different. The live sand gets a mat similar to golf green! Calm surface areas in the sump get a thin cool looking green film (also closest to the light) Will take your advice! But what would be the right conditions for a beneficial bio film? Is there such a thing? I raised the water level in the sump a bit and found without a super calm surface area (exposed rock..causing surface pockets) most is swept away and skimmed out (good feed for rots anyone?)....Is anyone feeding rots..can you use nice greenwater out of a primative skimmer?
 

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If by 'golf green' you mean something turf-y, with individual structures, then herbivores can be used as a control.

Snails are a weak, if durable option.
Sacoglossan slugs are a thorough but short-lived (months) option.
Urchins are sometimes an excessively-thorough option.
It all depends on the surface area and surface type to be grazed,
and what sort of algae are involved

I was earlier talking about (mostly-algal) bio-films... while there are herbivores for even those, such films are often more efficiently managed by hands-on, hobbyist intervention (siphoning or teasing off, followed by outright removal from the tank).

:)
 
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