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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my dad and I have a 90 gal reef that has been overrun with cyano for sometime but we are just now getting serious about getting rid of it. My dad thinks it would be easier just to drain everything and start from scratch but I disagree. I made a bet with him today to give me 3 weeks to try to get rid of it myself and if that doesnt show any signs of promise we are going to reset the tank. Currently in the tank are 2 percula clowns, 3 peppermint shrimp, ~10 astrea snails, and a small frag of galaxia coral with about ~50 lbs of live rock. Any suggestions on how to get this under control so that we dont have to reset the whole tank? I just cleaned the protein skimmer out this morning. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Welcome to TRT reef boy!
To forewarn you this thread will probably be moved to general discussion as this portion of the forum is for highly informational information on what's going on in our tanks and how they work. If you spend just a week reading the stuff in this part of the forum I'm willing to bet you could solve this on your own ;)

Where is the cyano growing at? How much flow do you have? What maintenance do you do? How much do you feed? And do you clean the sandbed or blow off your rocks with a turkey baster or powerhead?

With some good knowledge and a plan you can beat this, but it might take a moth or two depending on how bad it is and where the nutrients are coming from. I would suggest not to tear down the tank. Whatever is causing this would still be there unless you got new rocks and new sand, even then without the knowledge of how it happened in the first place your not preventing it from happening again.

To start, check out the reefkeeping made easy thread linked in my signature and located within this part of the forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! I've read multiple threads over the issue on multiple sites but am not sure how to attack it most efficiently. The cyano is currently all over. The rocks are covered in it and the sand is too. We have 2 hydor power heads on opposite sides of the tank pointed down at about 15 degrees below parallel. Water change 2-3 times a week. Feed a pinch of fish flake every other day 1 a day. Today I worked for 2 hours scraping off the cyano and pulling it out with a net and I'm planning to start sucking the gravel with a hose later tonight. My dad is an experienced fish keeper 30+ years and I've been helping him since I was around 6(currently 18) and he wants to chuck everything except for the fish, invertebrate and coral frag obviously, I'm just opposed to that because that throws some $200 away atleast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The tank has been up for years, this is the first cyano bloom that we have had though. We used to suck the gravel once every 1-2 weeks but now try to do it whenever we have the time. The bed is about 2in deep.
 

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So it sounds like you used to have a good maintenance routine and you just kindve slacked off for lack of a better phrase. I think if you just get back in the game you will be fine. Unfortunately having a tank with sand, we reefkeeping on a fine line of enough and too much. When your export doesn't meet your import too many nutrients get trapped in the tank and sometimes (who am I kidding, most of the time) undesirable organisms take hold.

A nice deep clean once a week should get you back to 'normal'. You will never get rid of cyano. It's near impossible since coral can host cyano. How do you think they get their pretty colors ;)
 

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He only has a flow rate of 10x in his tank. I'll repeat here what I said in your other thread -
That's WAY too low of flow for a 90 gallon tank. Your waste is settling on your rocks and soaking in, that's what's fueling your cyano. I have two 1050 gph powerheads in my 55 just to give you an idea of flow in comparison. In a 90g tank I would want 3150-3600 gph flowing through it. The point of adequate flow is to avoid "dead spots" where waste will settle and soak into rocks and sand - this fuels algae later on. If it remains suspended by flow it breaks down in the water and can be removed by skimming and water changes. Upping your flow will help tremendously.

Also, I see here that you are feeding mainly flakes. Switching to frozen or live food will also help. Pellets and flakes will fuel your cyano as well.
 

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yes for my 90 gal i just bought a pair of mp10s to go with my return pump,tunze and jebao wp40… now thats a flow i like
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Turns out that the powerheads we have are 850 gph sorry about that, I couldn't find a box and was going off a price my dad said he got them for so maybe try redirecting the flow towards the rocks? For the feeding, we have frozen blocks of brine shrimp and algae that we occasionally use as a supplement so maybe switch to that instead of the flakes for the feeding of every other day?
 

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That's better than two 450s but still very low for a tank that size. I'd still increase the flow. And yes, feeding more frozen and less flake should help as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Sounds good thanks for the help guys. I'll try your suggestions and update in a couple of weeks. Thank you for all the help, it is appreciated!��
 
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