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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

I recently had sprung a on the base of my 72g bowfront and had to quickly go out an purchase a new one. I transferred everything out of my old one, salvaged 3/4 of my water and had no casualties during this hectic time. My old tank had coraline algae growth all over the back of it and the sides. I have scraped it all off but it has left some sort of residue on the glass which kind of looks like salt creep residue. I was wondering if anyone knew of a good way to get rid of this stuff safely so I can reseal my the tank and use it in the future. I was wondering if maybe the Safe & Easy spray would do the job or maybe just some sort of vinegar?? Any input would help!! Thanks for your time
 

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r e e f e r 4 l i f e
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Yep. Vinegar will work good. You can make a vinegar solution with some water and spray it on and wipe the coralline away that way. It'll still be kinda difficult though unfortunately. What works best is if you can fill the tank with water and vinegar and let it sit for a couple days but with the leak I guess you won't be able to do that. Ugg.
 

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Tell me about it..uggh..I have done so much scrubbing already..I will get right on the vinegar solution and see if that helps at all..Thanks for the advice.
 

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r e e f e r 4 l i f e
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if you can get it clean enough to just reseal the crack I would just do that. Then you can fill the tank up with water and vinegar and let it sit for a couple days and your problem will be solved without any more scubbing. Scrubbing and scraping sucks for sure.
 

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if you can get it clean enough to just reseal the crack I would just do that. Then you can fill the tank up with water and vinegar and let it sit for a couple days and your problem will be solved without any more scubbing. Scrubbing and scraping sucks for sure.
You cannot just seal over the leak. A tank leak indicates that the seal between the panes is no good. You cannot just smear silicone over the joints and call it fixed. New silicone does not bond to old silicone. Smearing silicone over the existing seams does nothing for the failed structural seam between the panes of glass and while it may hold temporarily, there is a ticking timebomb buried under that silicone. Since water has already penetrated between the panes, the failed area can spread until you end up with a major seam failure.

A glass tank is held together by the silicone squished between the panes of glass. The smears of silicone in the corners are just to protect the structural silicone between the panes. In fact, you really don't need the silicone spread into the corners to hold the tank together.

To properly fix a glass tank it needs to be dismantled and completely resealed.
 

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Oh. Dang. I wasn't aware of that. Probably not a good idea then.
 
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