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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
paid 75 for a croaca clam, looking to trade it for some acros. the reason i'm selling is because i'm not wanting to feed it anymore its about 4 inchs maybe 5 inchs i'v been feeding it phyto plankton and zooplex. its doing well.
 

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Shouldn't have to feed it at that size. After 3" they have enough surface area to feed themselves, or so I have read. I never feed the clams I got last year @ 2.5-3" and All I got was good growth. JIME (1 croaca 3 dersa).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i ghot told by theplace i got them (vividaquariums) that they needed to be feed till 6 inchs, is that worng?? opinions please!
 

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don't get rid of it...just don't feed it!!! i had a 3" or so that grew to a 5-6" easy. just feed it ca and alk. no need to put phyto in there...they don't filter much..they are light lovers

Lunchbucket
 

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Nyles said:
He may get some Cycplopeeze here and there but its not target feed, just whats left of target feeding sps
Clams will not eat cyclopeze (though I imagine they might eat bacteria that might be produced as a result of feeding large amounts of cyclopeze and having excess ones decompose).

Clams filter much much smaller particles from the water than cyclopeze - clams are very selective about what they eat and will only eat very tiny particles. Cyclopeze are huge compared to what clams eat.
 

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I would say that if you stop the feeding, watch the clam very carefully to make sure it is still growing steadily. If it stops growing, don't wait too long to figure out what is wrong and to fix the problem (might be inadequate food, inadequate light, or other problems).

Based on a few bad clam experiences, I have come to the conclusion that if a clam stops growing it is an indication of a serious problem that, if continued for an extended time period, will likely kill the clam. A clam that has stopped growing like this might look fine for quite a few months. Then one day the incurrent siphon is gaping and a few days later the mantle is not extended normally. By this point it is probably too late to save the clam. One day not long from the observation of the gaping incurrent siphon the clam will be dead. It might seem that the death was sudden, but I'm pretty convinced that most of these cases of apparent sudden deaths in giant clams were not sudden at all....the path toward death started when the clam stopped growing.

I'm pretty convinced that I lost a squamosa clam or two due to starvation a few years ago. They were in a tank with lots and lots of small feather duster worms, and I'm guessing that the worms outcompeted the clam for small particulate foods. I was not doing any special feeding for the clams. One of the ones I lost was very small. The other was much larger. The larger one looked great for months, but was not growing. I should not have ignored this early warning sign. I'm convinced that by the time the siphon started gaping it was too late for me to do anything about the problem.

Your clam might do fine without special feeding, especialy if you don't have a high density of other highly efficient filter feeders in your tank (like my high density of feather dusters).

Personally though, I've been scarred by some bad experiences, and so I'm feeding the clam you gave me (actually, feeding the tank mostly!) nearly every day. So far so good (and I can get away with this high level of feeding because of my algal turf scrubber). The growth of that crocea in the last month has been impressive. I have no idea how it would be doing if I were not feeding it though of course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
:bawling: ooooohhhh not a phone call or nuthing and now he wants a date.....tsk....tsk....tsk
 
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