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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, this is a widely debated topic: Should you or should you not do weekly water changes during the cycling process?

Today I did a water change of about 10-20% (took out 2 gallons out of my 20 gallon L tank) after about only a little over a week of cycling a brand new tank w/ only 20 lbs of LR (Fully cured from my LFS) and LS (Caribsea). Did this slow my already slow cycling process in any way?? I haven't had any ammonia spike or nitrite spike yet and it has been almost 9 days.

I have read on several different forums that doing water changes before the cycling process had a chance to complete will slower or delay the cycling process. Is this true?

The reason why I did a water change was because I read somewhere online for LR instructions that you should do weekly water changes during the cycling process. Plus I did not want to kill any forms of life on my expensive live rock by letting the ammonia and nitrite spike too high. However, I think this was a mistake because I have had no rise at all in ammonia or nitrites, however, the nitrates were a little high.
 

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+1 no w/c's
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone :)
I'll leave the water in till the cycles done
 

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I don't change the water during, just near the end when my nitrates have soared but I don't have ammonia or nitrite anymore.
 

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I see no reason to change the water during a cycle, as kindof a 1 step forward 2 steps back kinda thing. If you used fully cured live rock and you're seeing a raise in nitrates, chances are your tank is cycled already. The thing to remember is that the bacteria will adjust by dying or multiplying based on your bio load, so if you have no bio load then add a big one it could cycle again. For this reason, you may want to consider intentionally adding ammonia or something to get that ammonia spike you're looking for, then once that goes away (with cured rock shouldn't take long) would change enough water to get nitrates in order, then add your fish while the bacteria are still there and ready for action

I'm a newb, take my advice with a grain of salt.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks for the advice. i hope my small water change did not stall my cycle :\
but then again, im going to have to move my tank to another desk because it looks like the one I have it on cannot support its weight. I'm guessing taking out the 75% of the water + live rock to move the tank will probably start a new cycle anyway. Might as well buy some more live rock today. Thinking of around 5 more pounds
 

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thanks for the advice. i hope my small water change did not stall my cycle :\
but then again, im going to have to move my tank to another desk because it looks like the one I have it on cannot support its weight. I'm guessing taking out the 75% of the water + live rock to move the tank will probably start a new cycle anyway. Might as well buy some more live rock today. Thinking of around 5 more pounds
Just keep from keeping it out of water for very long and you'll be fine. If you have to, ask a friend to borrow a cooler. No sense in killing perfectly good bacteria that you paid a pretty penny for by something that easily avoidable. Heck, you might even get away with putting it in the tub with the drain plugged haha (not really suggesting that unless you have a 100% clean tub and live in an apartment lol)
 

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Doing a water change during the cycle will not extend or delay the cycle in anyway. The only effect of removing some of the ammonia/nitrite is that it will reduce the amount of nitrate that will be present after the cycle completes.

The same amount of bacteria will be present afterwards whether the ammonia/nitrite peaks or is slightly reduced by a water change. This is because the bacteria that grew explosively by feeding on the excess ammonia/nitrite during the upward slope of the cycle now has less to consume so the population of bacteria starts to slowly dieoff on the downward slope of the cycle.

This is why even after your tank is cycled, you need to slowly add livestock.
 

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If you get things on the live rock that you want to live, waterchanges can be helpful to them. They can also help you get into the habit of changing the water. That being said I just let it ride until a tank is cycled and then do my first big waterchange.
 
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