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Founder-Canton Reef Club
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Other than these big ballon like tumors growing out of his gills. I thought he would be dead by now. Has had them for like over 2 months.

Todd
 

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Noo Doot Aboot It!
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Wow, I have never seen anything like that before. I hope you can figure it out and make him better.
 

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I'm thinking fishy-roids!!! :lol:
 

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Sumpless Girl
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let me guess, his name is bubbles :clown:

they look so big they may pop on their own
i had a black tetra (freshwater) and he had something like that but on his lip. it got enormous, he still managed to eat though and went about his buisness.
after several months it just got so huge it bursted. it never came back again. he lived for 4 years
i never knew what it was :confused:
 

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I found this:

Infectious Dropsy
Symptoms:
Typical dropsy has several symptoms: bulging eyes, regressing eyes, pale gills, inflamed anus. In some cases the belly may be inflated, red spots can be seen on the skin, as well as damage to the fins.

Cause:
This disease is caused by a pathogen on which researches cannot agree. It is widely believed that 2 bacteria causes dropsy, namely "Aeromonas Punctata" and "Pseudomonas Flourescens".

Treatment:
Like Ich, dropsy is extremely infectious. Fish are mainly receptive to dropsy if they have been weakened by stressful conditions caused by poor water conditions or another disease. Treatment is difficult, therefore prevention is key. Good maintenance of the water conditions as well as early detection and treatment of other diseases is a good measure. If a fish is diagnosed with dropsy, the ailing fish should be immediately removed and destroyed.
<O:p></O:p>
 

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And this as well:

Gas Bubble Disease
Symptoms:
Bubbles/blisters can be found beneath the skin and inside the body. They are mostly found around the head and the eyes.

Cause:
A condition known as "over saturation" is created due to the dissolving of excess amounts of gas. A certain amount of gas is always dissolved in liquid in relationship to such factors as pressure and temperature. When these gas levels are to high, the water will constantly attempt to release the gas in the form of small bubbles. Too much sun and the heavy plant and algae growth associated with this is a common cause of over saturation. Since the plants take up and release a lot of oxygen, the fishes' blood can itself become over saturated.

Treatment:
Reduce the amount of sun light the aquarium is exposed to. Further, an air stone can help prevent problems.
<O:p></O:p>
 

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Wow, I don't know what that is. I am not so sure it is gas bubble disease...it doesn't look like your tank is covered in algae and plant life. What about tank maintenance...are you doing regular water changes?

I'm bumping this in the hope that someone will know what it is. Is he eating okay?
 

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Sumpless Girl
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yeah rule out dropsy, ive seen dropsy and it never looked like huge bubbles, more so a bloated fish with raised scales kinda like a porcipine

if hes been fine for 2 months i would just leave him be. left mine alone and he recovered on his own, partly because i didnt know what it was or how to treat it, so if you cant get exactly what it is dont treat, you may do more harm than good.
if on the other hand you know what that odd disorder is and have a known fix for it then by all means treat
:)
 

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Perhaps it's gas bubble disease?

Gas Bubble Disease

Symptoms:
Bubbles/blisters can be found beneath the skin and inside the body. They are mostly found around the head and the eyes.

Cause:
A condition known as "over saturation" is created due to the dissolving of excess amounts of gas. A certain amount of gas is always dissolved in liquid in relationship to such factors as pressure and temperature. When these gas levels are to high, the water will constantly attempt to release the gas in the form of small bubbles. Too much sun and the heavy plant and algae growth associated with this is a common cause of over saturation. Since the plants take up and release a lot of oxygen, the fishes' blood can itself become over saturated.

Treatment:
Reduce the amount of sun light the aquarium is exposed to. Further, an air stone can help prevent problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I sent the pictures to my contact at the Georgia Aqaurium. He thinks it's a goiter of all things. Cardnials get those accoring to him. Here are his responses.




"Todd,
If the growth is either a mass or fluid I would leave it to resolve on it's own unless the animal stops eating. I think the fish has goiter. It is not a transmittable disease and may resolve by adding iodine. It is difficult to test but also difficult to OD Iodine. I would add about 10% more of your Iodine supplement than suggested by the label for 14 days and see what happens."




"
Todd,
Good Gosh! I can't really tell from the photos but I have a couple of
ideas. It looks a lot like goiter. It is possible that you have some sort a
parasite, but cardinals often form goiter that pushes outside of the body
cavity, which is better than in sharks where it pushes up on the and
eventually blocks the esophagus. Sometimes goiter resolves itself and
sometimes it can be surgically removed.
First a couple of questions:
1. How is this fish eating? Does it eat well and does it consume food
particles that are about the correct size for the fish?
2. The growths: Are they fluid and bouncy like the eyes of a bubble eye
goldfish, or are the masses more solid?
3. Do you maintain Iodine in your system?
In a reef tank usually you do not have nitrate or phosphate issues that
would lead to goiter. I have noticed that our cardinals here have also
formed goiter as well. Out of curiosity do you feed cyclpeze?


Kevin


 

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That is totally weird looking. I hope that it turns out ok for that pretty little fish. What kind of fish is it? Looks like a wrasse.
 

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My guess is it is a Orangestriped Cardinalfish.
 
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