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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the process of planning a new reef build.

And am really wanting a bubble tip to host my tomato clownfish that i will be putting in there.

Am just wondering shall i put the anemone in early? before other corals?, or just not mount the corals on to the rock before it has found it space?

Thanks a lot
 

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Agree with the others - make sure your tank is mature and stable before adding an anemone (around a year). I would suggest not gluing down any rocks or coral if you plan on having an anemone so you an move coral out of it's path if it moves around (or be prepared to accept the fact that you may lose some pieces if you do). There are many corals that clowns will choose to host them as well.
 

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Active Anemone
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6-8 months is the minimum id wait to get that tank stable.

Make sure the nitrates are under control before adding a bubble tip. Other anemones are easier to keep then the bubble tip but you should have no problems if the tank is 6-8 months with low nitrate levels.
 

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My tomato hosted the BTA in my tank almost immediately. Within an hour of dropping the clown in the tank. Hopefully you are that lucky.
 

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screamin-reefer
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keeping bubble tips are the easiest anemones to keep except for aiptasia. they don't move much unless they're really unhappy. they love lots of light. feeding isn't necessary for any anemone if the lighting is very bright. if you want to supplement their diet a few brine shrimp or Mysis shrimp are fine. nothing chunky or solid. anemones can die from over feeding. 4 to 6 months is fine if you feel things are going good. if you buy a healthy anemone a trick you can use is to take him out of the shipping bag and set his foot on a piece of rock out of water. give him 15-20 minutes to attach to the rock. then put in the tank. they can be out of water up to an hour. if you can buy one already attached. make sure not to buy one if they damage his foot in any way. one way to pair them is to bag them together.
woody
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What other anemone's would you suggest that would host a Tomato clown ??
 

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Reefaholic
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keeping bubble tips are the easiest anemones to keep except for aiptasia. they don't move much unless they're really unhappy. they love lots of light. feeding isn't necessary for any anemone if the lighting is very bright. if you want to supplement their diet a few brine shrimp or Mysis shrimp are fine. nothing chunky or solid. anemones can die from over feeding. 4 to 6 months is fine if you feel things are going good. if you buy a healthy anemone a trick you can use is to take him out of the shipping bag and set his foot on a piece of rock out of water. give him 15-20 minutes to attach to the rock. then put in the tank. they can be out of water up to an hour. if you can buy one already attached. make sure not to buy one if they damage his foot in any way. one way to pair them is to bag them together.
woody
seahorse aquarium and supply - I'm a sponsor
Good advice, another thing I would look for is a gaping mouth. The mouth on the nem should be closed like sealed lips. A gaping mouth is a clear sign of an unhealthy nem.
 

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screamin-reefer
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choosing a healthy anemone isn't really difficult - if it's fully inflated and has good uniform color you're pretty safe . if see the mouth open it's not likely inflated . sticky anemones [are actually trying to sting you] are healthy . removing anemones from a rock is almost impossible - buy the rock . removing from glass is a very slow process which requires irritating the foot slowly until the anemone lets loose . it might pis* off the LFS owner but get the one you want undamaged . btw you don't acclimate anemones ever .
woody
Good advice, another thing I would look for is a gaping mouth. The mouth on the nem should be closed like sealed lips. A gaping mouth is a clear sign of an unhealthy nem.
 

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Ive had better luck acclimating them over 3 hours to light and water then not. The difference being the nem being/staying open throughout the acclimation process and after being put into a spot, with no acclimation the nem would just deflate for a few days then open.

I use a plastic container, put a cover over it (since its so close to the lights) and add in 1/2 cup tank water every 20 mins until container is fullish, dump out half and continue until container is full (2-3 hours) , then place nem in desired spot that is shaded partially. Did that with 3 nems and all 3 stayed inflated throughout the acclimation process and after being introduced. The other 3 nems that were put into my friends tank were acclimated for 20 mins only and stayed deflated for several days.
 

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acclimatethe nem to the water. Over an hour or so, and you should be fine. Just make sure to watch them the first day or two when they are in your tank. They will find the spot they like the most even if it's on top of one of your prize corals.
 

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Reefaholic
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choosing a healthy anemone isn't really difficult - if it's fully inflated and has good uniform color you're pretty safe . if see the mouth open it's not likely inflated . sticky anemones [are actually trying to sting you] are healthy . removing anemones from a rock is almost impossible - buy the rock . removing from glass is a very slow process which requires irritating the foot slowly until the anemone lets loose . it might pis* off the LFS owner but get the one you want undamaged . btw you don't acclimate anemones ever .
woody
True, I was just thinking when I started with nems... I wouldn't have really known too much a difference between inflated/deflated, but definitely would know what a gaping mouth looked like.
 

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Officer Tang
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You might consider your plans for other fish before introducing a tomato. I love these guys, but they are nasty. They chase fish out of the tank when they approach the nem and they bite your mercilessly when you put your hand in the tank. If you go this route make sure you cover the tank with a screen.
 

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choosing a healthy anemone isn't really difficult - if it's fully inflated and has good uniform color you're pretty safe . if see the mouth open it's not likely inflated . sticky anemones [are actually trying to sting you] are healthy . removing anemones from a rock is almost impossible - buy the rock . removing from glass is a very slow process which requires irritating the foot slowly until the anemone lets loose . it might pis* off the LFS owner but get the one you want undamaged . btw you don't acclimate anemones ever .
woody
Wait why do you say to not acclimate them ever? I would say you are gonna have a pissed anemone if you just throw him in.

I have always acclimated mine. ALWAYS!
 

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screamin-reefer
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I import 150 to 200 anemones every year. sometimes 5 or 6 are in 1 bag and 1 cup of saltwater up to 24 hours. and all shrunk up. we set each one on a rock in a tank. less then 30 minutes later they're sticking to rock and opening. we loose 1 or 2%.
Really u don't acclimate them ?
 

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I would also recommend the average reefer acclimate their anemones. Woody, having your own store, I'm sure you've lived and breathed fish all day for a long time. You have many years of experience keeping your system in optimum condition for new additions and know what to look for/how to keep things running smoothly for sensitive animals. Most reefers may be a little less detail oriented or don't know all the things to look for that you do.

Since anemones are made mostly of water a sudden change in parameters can be hard on them. If your tank water is very different from the water they came from it can be stressful to just dump them in the tank suddenly. I'd suggest a decent acclimation period to be on the safe side. I will add that if your tank isn't ready or the conditions in it aren't favorable to an anemone the even the slowest most careful acclimation won't ensure that it will live.
 
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