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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my blue linckia has been doing great. and is still moving around the tank happily. the other day i noticed a few spots that looked ripped on one leg. the next day (2 two) it seemed to be gone. I now see one again. any idea what this is or how it happened? i wondered if it was a rock or maybe a crab? will it heal?
 

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I'm guessing this is a semi-new addition...unfortunately linkia's have very dismal survival rates...they are actually pretty hardy once they get acclimated...but there-in lies the problem...it is very hard to get a specimen that has been properly acclimated at every stop in the supply chain...they must have a very slow drip acclimation...if anyone in chain up-line of you skimps your specimen is doomed...the problem is that it takes weeks before the symptoms of poor handling/acclimation start to show up...now for the really bad news...it is very unlikely your star will heal...the degeneration you see will likely continue until the star just dissolves away...you'll want to keep a close eye on him and pull him out before he fouls the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
it has been in our tank for about 2 months or a little longer. we did drip it as we do everything we add to our tank. the other day when i saw this, there were 2 spots and now there is only 1. i don't know if one of them healed or what? what should we look for as far as when to take it out if that's what it comes to. also, how bad will it foul a tank? there are plenty of times we can not see it because it's on the back of a rock. if it dies, will it just be a mess or will it kill the tank?
 

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Starfish are known for their regenerating appendages. Like if a limbs is lost or damaged then the star will grow it back, and in some cases the limb will grow back the starfish! So if they can do that, then I'm sure that minor injury will heal fine:) But if it keeps going away and comes back, I would check the cause of it. It could be acrab or a fish nipping at it. Keep a close eye!;)
 

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While it's true that stars do regenerate and even reproduce this way, it's unfortunately very rare for a linkia in captivity to heal/regenerate. Keep watching it...if the degeneration continues I would err on the side of removing it...do you have a "hospital" tank you could put it in for observation? What's in your photos is very typical of what happens when linkia's start to show the symptoms of poor handling.

I hate to sound so negative...I've just seen a lot of linkia's do the same thing...I refuse to buy or even recommend them any more because so many of them die from poor handling somewhere in the supply chain.
 

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While it's true that stars do regenerate and even reproduce this way, it's unfortunately very rare for a linkia in captivity to heal/regenerate. Keep watching it...if the degeneration continues I would err on the side of removing it
This, unfortunately, is quite common; especially seeing that many LFS and intermediate steps of the chain of custody run low salinity systems to save a few bucks. Two months is about right for this to have occurred at the LFS level. Although I imagine that a specimen kept in a system with plenty of sponges and detrital accumulations (generally not conditions found in quarantine or hospital tanks), an established DSB, mature rock, and VERY steady salinities MAY result in a recovery, I have to say that recovery at this point of hydrolacrimal system damage is rare, andmoving this specimen to a hospital tank with anything less than ideal mature marine system conditions will result in the loss of the specimen.

Not a pleasant sight, but this is what you have to look forward to:









Sorry for your loss.
 
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