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Now were talkin!:D Clams are awesome they actually change colors depending on which angle you look at them,they are especially sweet from above.Metal halides really bring out the colors,I love to add them all over the rocks and sand because they add so much color and if they are over 3 in they are fairly easy to keep since they dont require as much DTS in the water column they will feed off of the light. They come in many different colors and patterns although some can get kinda pricey,I think every reef should have at least one clam to have a diverse reef
with as many life forms as possible and check this out they actually eat NITRATES can you beleive it they help you do what only a water change or caulerpa or a refuge can do they ROCK!
Dont tell anyone Im going for 20 in my reef:D
 

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Tank has changed so that I have no Nitrates I have to add Turbo calcium daily they suck up alot, and my skimmer doesnt produce as much as it use to another added benefit.:)
 

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Hmm---wouldn't this actually be a bi-monthly thread? ;) Instead of bi-weekly? heh heh

I hope to add more to this soon...I just got another clam last night. :)
 

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I love clams. They are the most colorful specimens in my tank. They suck up nitrates like a pricey Kents Marine product ;) and they are like THE symbol of reef diving... the GIANT clam! Every diver has to have a picture taken with one of those bad boys!
 

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Clarification: If a clam is under 3 inches, it will require direct feeding, daily, every few days, weekly, etc..? If over 3 inches will thrive and grow off of light predominantly, with ocassional feedings?
Are croceas hardier than maximas? Will they stay if placed high on the reef scape? Can they be epoxied to the rock?
I have been thinking of getting one but educating myself first. They are somewhat expensive.
Thanks
Sean
 

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sean said:
Clarification: If a clam is under 3 inches, it will require direct feeding, daily, every few days, weekly, etc..? If over 3 inches will thrive and grow off of light predominantly, with ocassional feedings?
Are croceas hardier than maximas? Will they stay if placed high on the reef scape? Can they be epoxied to the rock?
I have been thinking of getting one but educating myself first. They are somewhat expensive.
Thanks
Sean
Yes...Clams under three inches will need food to supplement while they work on ironing out the sybiotic relationship with zooxanthella. Some folks who aquaculture these clams will pump nitrates and other nutrients into their clambeds. Once they get older, they still continue to pump gallons of water per day and strain said water, but they also use the photosyntetic end products of zooxanthella as nutrients. It's real neat!

I hear that Croceas are easier than maximas.

Clams will adhere to LR via their Byssus gland. DO NOT EPOXY a clam to a reef! They will take all by themselves. If you plan on keeping them in the sand, give them a little piece of flat rubble to adhere to. They may, or may not. In the end, it will protect the weakest spot on the clam from predation from worms, snails and other creepy crawlies!

There are a lot of clam resources out there. I applaud you at aiming for an education before purchase. Good luck!

<D>
 

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I have added an oyster shell under all of my clams and only one has taken hold. I don't know what the consesus is on this theory. I have heard to place them in the sandbed w/o the shell, w/ the the shell, and on the rockwork. I guess this is another case of whatever works just go with it. I love the coloration of the clam and the way they react to subtle changes. They are a filter feeder therefore, they are aiding in keeping the water params where they need to be( zero nitrates). It is awseome to look down throught he water on the clam from above, rather than through the glass. If you use any less than MH lighting then you are abusing your clam. They like intense light and will deteriorate over time without it. The last thing I have to say about Tridacna clams is that if it attaches it's self to the rockwork...do not move it. He is happy there. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
my crocea has attached itself firmly to a small piece of LR. my guess it really depends on the species.

i also got a crocea because i heard they were easier to keep than the maximas.

ok guys, which like sand and which like rock.

G~
 

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I dont know if this is how it is suppose to be but my Croceas like the sand and my Maximas like the rocks or they seem to:) mo
 

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Maximas definately like to attach to rock. Even some of my friends who have them in the sand, have them on a burried rockin the sand.

Squamosa's typically like sand, but will attach to rock too. I provide a rock beneath it because I've seen peoples clams get attacked by larger worms. If it attaches, it attaches. If it doesn't, it's on its own :)

<D>
 

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the hardiest species of tridacna clams is the derassa, the least hardiest is the crocea. the gigas grow rapidly and can attian sizes upto 4ft:eek:
gigas, derasas and hippopus lose their byssal gland relying on their weight to hold them in place. the crocea likes to burrow into live rock using it byssal muscle, then using byssal threads to secure itself inside the rock. crocea clams require intense lighting, but the squamosa clam don't, and do better under at the bottom of the tank in coarse substrate. and then there's the maximas, which fits nicely in the middle of everything!
i have derasa, and plan on adding a maxima in the near future. not only do clams look great in a reef tank, they are also benfitical, because they are filter feeders!

:cool:
 

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My Crocea clam seems to do the best in my tank. I have 2 squamosa's, a Crocea and a Maxima. The rock in the sandbed idea is one I've never heard before...sounds like a winner. Is there any definitive evidence(articles) on ideal placement. It seems as though everyone has their own idea regarding placement and hardiness. A consensus would be nice.
 

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and they taste good too...... ;)

I've got a Squamosa and he's doing great. I wouldn't agree that any clam under three inches needs supplemental feedings... I got mine at about 2 inches, he's now 3 inches and has put on 5 notches on his shell. Not once have I supplemented feeding for him.

At first he was under 110 watts of 10,000K PC with 40 watts of Actinic supplement, now he's under 250 10,000K MH and 110 watts of actinic supplement. He definately started showing major growth when I got him under halides...
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Buzz_Hog said:
I've got a Squamosa and he's doing great. I wouldn't agree that any clam under three inches needs supplemental feedings... I got mine at about 2 inches, he's now 3 inches and has put on 5 notches on his shell. Not once have I supplemented feeding for him.
now buzz, this can have a lot to do with a persons system. the more mature a system is the more free floating food around for the clam to feed on. how efficient was your skimmer is another consideration. the clam could have been cleaning the water better than your skimmer.;) from what i have read the more mature the system is the greater your chances for success are with the smaller clams. whether this is due to maturity on the aquarists part or the increased amount of food in the water column i do not know.

G~
 

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Toadfish said:
Is there any definitive evidence(articles) on ideal placement. It seems as though everyone has their own idea regarding placement and hardiness. A consensus would be nice.
Honestly, I have come to trust Anthony Calfo, Bob Fenner and others who have helped me immensely in the set up and care of my tanks. If you have a chance to buy or at least read their new book "Reef Invertibrates", there is a great chapter on giant clams. Their research comes from years of experiences, both their own, and of those that they come into contact with day after day.

David
 
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