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Anyone use some sort of pad or matt between their aquarium and it's stand, and if so, what is it and do you have pictures?
 

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why? I would think that any material may lead to the tank 'sliding' around....leading to the 'unspeakable' CRASH! onto the floor

are you try to avoid scratching up a wood-based stand or something? if thats the case, I've heard of using kitchen cabinet liner (a.k.a shelf liner or shelf paper).....preferably black???
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
bump
 

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I used a layer of thick foam tape. Sorry, no pics. It's just foam tape with one sticky side. I ran it on every edge that the tank was going to sit on.
 

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i seen pics of people using a think styrofoam sheet, once the tank is positioned you can cut the excess away with a sharp knife, im sure anything will work, but why do you want to pad the bottom?
 

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at my old house we had a layer of pink insulation, the sheet kind, to help level the tank because the built in area that it was set up on was just a tiny bit unlevel. It worked great. If your stand is level you shouldn't have to have anything between the tank and the stand tho.
 

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The styrofoam sheet is rigid enough to withstand the weight of the tank without totally collapsing the foam, yet still compress enough to distribute the weight of the tank to prevent potential cracking of glass tanks. This is especially true when building your own stand, or your tank stand will be sitting on a floor of an older home. Unless you are a reasonably GOOD carpenter and you tested your stand with a straight edge for gaps in the levelness of your stand, the use of 1cm thick sheets of styrofoam to even out weight distribution over the edges will prevent stress risers from either unlevel stands, or unlevel floors, and will accomodate issues with legs of unequal length on home made stands. This is not much of an issue with smaller tanks, but as the tank gets longer, and the glass gets thicker, and the weight of the seawater in the tank becomes larger, small imperfections in the stand can become large stress risers for any imperfections in the glass (pits, scratches, manufacturing errors). Remember, it is very easy to cut glass, all you need is a small scratch and a stressor to snap the pane. The use of the sheet of styrofoam under the outer edge of glass tanks is cheap insurance to prevent sheet glass failure should any imperfections be introduced to the glass (rock slide in the tank, over-zealous algae scraping, accidental sharp contact with the outside of the tank by falling objects, etc.)

The easiest way to do this is to get a sheet of construction sheathing. This is the pink sheets of styrofoam seen on the exterior of homes just prior to application of brick or wood/vinyl fascia siding, and can be bought at any home improvement store (BLowes, Home Despot, etc.) for less than $10.00 USD for a 48"x96" sheet. It is easiest to handle if you remove the thin polyethylene sheathing layer by pealing it off the styro prior to cutting with a good sharp blade. Personally, I would suggest cutting it to the size of the tank plus a 5mm edge all the way around (to account for any compression of the foam as the tank is filled), then centering the tank on the sheet prior to filling .

Just spent a while going through the pix available to me remotely, I do not have one of the styro sheet already loaded at TRT or at home, but the written description should portray this application well.


HTH
 

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Again, another well versed reply from Tom.
Tom has said it all. My cousin is setting up a 125 fresh water tank, made the stand himself,and he asked me what to use under(or maybe i told him to use the styro sheets beforehand).He did what i mentioned, and after a bit of the tank being on the stand(no water yet at the time)he calls me up , all concerned ,,since on one corner of his homemade stand the front section of wood, had shrunk somewhat. I told him not to worry, and had checked out the "problem" in person, b4 i told him to go ahead and fill the tank up. when he did , the styro pad leveled itself out, enuf to comp for the shrunken lumber(was not all that much, just enuf to actually see the seam open up a bit)
I would have been more concerned if the pad was not under the tank,,,,
Just my 2 cents, of a real life scenario,,,,,:wavey:
 

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I built a custom stand for my wife's 125 gallon tank and the 3/4" plywood top was uneven enough in a few spots to see light under the (empty) tank when I shone a flashlight behind it. To avoid stress risers in the glass, I used this approach (4 years ago, and no problems to date):

I positioned the tank exactly where I wanted it on the stand and then traced around it with a Sharpie marker. Then I measured the thickness of the tank bottom "rim" that would be setting on the stand and used a ruler to draw a line inside of the original one that I traced around the outside of the tank bottom. I used a router to route a channel within the lines to a depth of 1/4". Then I got a can of paste epoxy (JB Weld) and mixed it up on a board, rolled it into a rope and put it into the channel I routed. I then laid wax paper over the still soft epoxy in the channel and set the tank on it, pressing down so that the tank "mushed into" the epoxy. Remove the mushed-out epoxy with a putty knife after it starts to set a bit, otherwise it can get messy. After the epoxy hardened, I lifted the tank off and the epoxy was flat and level all the way around. (f you lift the tank and see any voids, just mix a little bit more epoxy paste and put it in the low spot, cover it with wax paper and put the tank back on to flatten it.)
 

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FYI you're replying to a thread from 2006.

I applaud your ingenuity but it was likely unnecessary work. As long as the corners are equally supported and the four corners of the stand are coplanar then any gaps on the sides and front are a not an issue.

All the weight bearing is in the corners.
 

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I was told to put a pad under our 400 by Miracles, aquarium makers.
I used a 1/2" foam board. Pic shows unfinished cabinet. I'll trim the excess of when I skin the cabinet this winter.

I was concerned about having the stand surface perfectly flat. 2x's from Home Depot pretty much guarantee an uneven finished product. I doubled up 3/4" solid core plywood with shims in-between to make as flat as possible. It was close, but there was a 1/8" gap in the center. T
It took several months for the tank to settle into that gap. I'm glad I did it that way.
 

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Reef Junkie
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think I should do that when I setup my 90g?
If its a rimmed glass tank then no, no foam. A lot of people do it but it really doesn't have any benefits but carries the risk of damaging the tank. Doubling up on the ply top and using shims would be fine IF the corners are not coplanar. If they are and there are only gaps along the front and sides then it's not necessary.
 
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