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Saltwater Mom
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Discussion Starter #1
I am thinking of getting the aquapod 24 all in one. I want to check first and see if it has sufficient lighting for anemones and corals? I was told by lfs my nano could support both and am finding the anemones dont survive long term. Please any info on this would be great.
 

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The Aquapods have more lighting than the JBJ NanoCube, but not enough for a Carpet Anemone (Aquapods only have 2.7 watts per gallon). I would be hesistant to put a Carpet Anemone in a Aquapod due to the size as well. Most anemones really need to be in tanks over 30 gallons with high lighting, IMO. They are very hard to keep, and a tank that is too small makes it even harder. Anemones are not for beginners. You could, however, keep many types of coral in an Aquapod: Mushrooms, Soft Corals, etc.

You might consider setting up a tank from scratch. It gives you more options in terms of livestock.

Check out this website for information on anemones.
<http://www.wetwebmedia.com/marine/inverts/cnidaria/anthozoa/anemonelightngfaqs.htm>
 

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Saltwater Mom
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Discussion Starter #3
Are there any "easy" anemones? I know I dont want a carpet I have seen how big they get. I am waiting to start a scratch reef until I can get the tank I want. I already have two 55 Fresh water a 20 Freshwater and my 12 Gallon Nano. I am running out of room hence the smaller reef. I considered converting one of my tropicals but heard it is very hard and may be more expensive? Anemone isnt a big deal but would like one. Thanks for info. Gonna read some more.
 

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It really isn't more expensive to convert a Fw to a SW reef, but you need to be positive that no copper medications were ever used in the tank, since the silicone sealant absorbs it. Copper is toxic to invertabrates (including anemones) and corals. You basically still need to buy all the equipment required for a reef tank, except for the tank and stand. It can save a couple hundred dollars. As far as "easy" anemones, a bulb tip (Entacmaea quadricolor) is probably the best. They require moderate lighting (4 watts/gallon) and are generally hardy. The addition of a maroon clowfish will improve their chances of survival. If you decide to get one, I would recommend www.LiveAquaria.com. They have very healthy livestock, and that is the first step in getting any animal to survive.
 
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