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+1 on the Nassarious snails.
Never tried Cerith.
Fighting Conch are pretty cool, & will turn over sand too.
 

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None of my ceriths ever dug into the sand when I had sand anyway.
 

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Just Another Reefer
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Ceriths are not sand sifters, nessarius snails do this.

White sand stars are good for sifting also.
 

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Quo vadis, Domini.
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My cerinths go down about 1.5" but only to feed off any algae on the glass.
 

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Ceriths are not sand sifters, nessarius snails do this.

White sand stars are good for sifting also.
Sand sifting stars will die in your tank...they run out of food and will eventually starve. They are better left in the ocean.


Ceriths are not really meant for the sand bed....queen & figting conch's are good for this as well as nassarius snails.
 

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The little florida ceriths I'll occasionally see on the front glass about 1" under the sand bed - I don't know if they do that it the rest of the sand though.
The bigger ones seem to be very lazy and really don't move much.

I'd go with Nassarius if you want sand sifting. A sea cucumber might be cool as well. A brittle star might also scavenge stuff off the sand - though they don't really dig around in it.
 

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My cucumber doesn't really dig--just mops up the surface of the sand.
The sand-feeding sea cucumbers are some of the best sandbed cleaners and agitators the aquarist can keep IMO, and many are inexpensive and readily available. Many of the species from the genus Holothuria, for example, are prolific detritus consumers able to literally ingest the top layer (1/2” or so) of the sandbed, clean the fine grains, (digesting detritus particles, bacteria and microalgae), and then expel it. This vacuum cleaner-like behavior keeps the sandbed looking great, while requiring very little maintenance on the aquarist’s behalf.

Sea cucumbers are echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata)—related to starfish, sea urchins and brittle stars. Taxonomically-speaking sea cucumbers are part of the subphyla Eleutherozoa or the motile echinoderms (as opposed to the sessile echinoderms like crinoids). Sea cucumbers mostly feed by 1) collecting food with feeder tentacles or 2) “vacuuming” sediment. It is the latter type of sea cucumber you will want to add in order to clean and shift the upper layer of the substrate.

Here is some more about sea cucs (including the potential risks):

Sea Cucumbers for the Marine Tank - Friend or Foe for the Saltwater Aquarium
 
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